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AN OVERBROAD PATENT ON E-READERS - This application from Qualcomm seeks to patent the idea of... detecting the user’s reading speed and controlling an electronic display! 10 minutes of your time can help narrow US patent applications before they become patents. Follow @askpatents on twitter to help.

QUESTION - Have you seen anything that was published before Dec, 2011 that discusses:

  1. Determining a reading speed of a user; AND
  2. Automatically advancing text on a display based on reading speed;

If so, please submit evidence of prior art as an answer to this question.

EXTRA CREDIT - A reference to anything that meets all of the criteria to the question above AND ALSO uses modification of brightness, contrast, font size, or resolution to draw the user’s attention outside the user’s current area of interest (basically, to move the eye toward the next chunk of text).

TITLE: ELECTRONIC READER DISPLAY CONTROL

Summary: [Translated from Legalese into English] A method of using reading speed of a user to advance text within an electronic display.

  • Publication Number: US 20130152014 A1
  • Application Number: 13/323,338
  • Assignee: Qualcomm, Inc
  • Prior Art Date: Seeking prior Art predating December 12, 2011
  • Open for Challenge at USPTO: Open through Dec 13, 2013

Claim 1 requires each and every step below:

A method of displaying text on a mobile display device, comprising:

  1. Determining a reading pane of a display screen operatively coupled with the mobile display device;

  2. Presenting text to a user in the reading pane;

  3. Determining a reading speed of the user based on user input; and

  4. Automatically advancing the text within the reading pane based on the determined reading speed of the user.

In English this means:

A method of displaying text on a mobile device, comprising:

  1. Creating a reading pane on the screen;

  2. Displaying text in the reading pane;

  3. Using input from the user to determine the reading speed of the user; and

  4. Advancing the text within the reading pane based on the reading speed of the user.

Good prior art would be evidence of a system that did each and every one of these steps prior to the December, 2011.

You're probably aware of ten pieces of art that meet this criteria already... separately, the applicant is claiming a method using all of the steps above and using modification of brightness, contrast, font size, or resolution to draw the user’s attention outside the user’s current area of interest (basically, to move the eye toward the next portion of text to be read).


"Automatic Scroll on Mobile Device" screen shots from the Applicant


What is good prior art? Please see our FAQ.

Want to help? Please vote or comment on submissions below. We welcome you to post your own request for prior art on other questionable US Patent Applications.


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4 Answers 4

At least since Adobe Reader 7 in 2005 there has been an autoscroll feature for the disabled. The speed of the autoscroll is controlled by hitting 1-9 for ten different rates.

Link

Screenshot

enter image description here

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Palm Reader Handbook (http://www.hpwebos.com/us/support/handbooks/F03/PalmReader_F03_ENG.pdf) is showing on page 16 an Auto-Scroll feature. Copyright on the document is 2000-2002 There is also an existing patent by Autodesk on proportional auto-scrolling : http://www.google.com/patents/US5528260

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Firefox v1.0 had middle-click autoscroll where the scroll speed was determined by the distance you moved your mouse from where you middle-clicked. Here is a bug in regards to the feature from 2004:

https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=247260

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Instapaper Pro for iPhone added automatic text scrolling in 2008 based on input received from a sensor measuring device orientation. There is a video demo of the feature from 2008 on YouTube.

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