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I've written a technical paper and have sent it for publication. There's a chance that some other can make use of my paper and file a patent before me. How to protect the paper, when we are publishing it before a patent has been taken for it.

Another situation in the same line is that you are explaining your business idea to angel investors. They may reject your idea there and set up the start-up as it was their own idea.What measures need to be taken for such situations.

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Simple old fashioned way - completely and in detail describe your idea/invention on the paper, put everything to the postal letter, glue - take to the Post office and send it to YOURSELF. When you will receive your own letter on your address - do not open it, save in that closed way for the court. The official postal date stamp on letter is the only and main proof of the date of invention, this letter must be given to the hands of judge - which can open it and make sure that you're the first author and all registered patents will be forced to reflect this discovery. The notarial registration of the copy can also be used. This is very old primitive but effective way and many patenting troll companies are really fear such things like unknown author which can show anytime to bring the claims for the invention.

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Huge myth! This answer is completely WRONG! It not recognized as evidence and if it were, it would be evidence that you had the idea by some particular time. With first-to-file no one cares when you thought of it, only when you either published or filed. What makes the answer worse is the OP has sent it for publication. The publication will prove he had the idea at the time of submission, if that mattered any more, which it doesn't. –  George White Jan 25 at 19:00
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That is hardly a flame. Incorrect advice was marked as such. –  Ron J. Jan 26 at 13:29
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It isn't elegant or optimal but you can take a copy of the paper, attach a provisional patent application cover sheet and a check and express mail it to the USPTO. Or do the electronic equivalent with PDFs.

Regarding inventors, they generally will not sign NDAs because they see so many plans that might have overlapping concepts. Again, a vey informal provisional application that is just your slide deck or product spec. Can be filed very inexpensively. If you do that don't think you're covered, just that you're covered to the extent of the content of what you filed.

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