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In reference to the patent: US20160034139

The patents link has no diagrams and hence it is very difficult to understand what this patent is all about. Can someone please explain?

The first claim reads:

A method for organizing options in an interface, comprising:

receiving data representing a type of domain object;

predicting, using a processor, one or more generic predicted events based at least in part on the type of domain object, wherein the one or more generic predicted events are predicted using a generic predictor;

receiving data representing an actual next event; and

updating the generic predictor based on the actual next event.

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Using www.google.com/patents tends to be unreliable especially in regards to patent figures. You should get better results using patents.google.com. In this case you can find the patent application with figures here: US20160034139A1. This is a patent application and not yet a patent. It was applied for less than three years ago so it isn't unusual that it hasn't issued yet. If and when it issues it is quite likely the claims will be amended or narrowed so what is there now isn't necessarily indicative of how broad the final patent's claims will be. In any case, according to the US Public Pair site, on 2-21-17 a Final Rejection was issued. It was rejected as unpatentable over US20140282178 in view of US20150082242. The final rejection can be challenged still, so perhaps there is still a faint chance for the patent to be issued.

This is not my field, but from what I can gather it describes a method of adjusting what is displayed with a computer user interface depending on the type of data being received and predicting what the data type will be received next.

  • has since been abandoned – George White Apr 26 at 18:53
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This is likely stuck in permanent application land due to patentability issues. It is difficult to understand a claim without the specification which is suppose to flesh out some of the elements in the claim language, e.g., generic predictor, domain object, actual next event, etc. Without having looked at the patent, including the spec., it seems as a rough guess this claim is directed to a computer processor predicting an event based on an input and then updating the processor based on input of a second, next event.

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