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I want to know how I can find out if US6506148 is a real patent or a hoax?

This is currently my first attempt to answer my question. I have not looked or

searched anywhere else.

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  • It is real, in that it was granted by the USPTO. Whether the technology would work or not is a separate issue. What makes you think it would be a hoax?
    – Maca
    Nov 5 '16 at 23:14
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It is a real patent in that it has been granted. That does not guarantee that the invention actually works. There is no burden to prove that a patented technology works before having a patent granted. If it doesn't work, it isn't much value as no one would want to infringe the patent anyway. This doesn't mean the patent won't cause problems as prior art for other inventions. That said, an invention that doesn't actually work should not, in my opinion, be granted a patent as it doesn't demonstrate utility or enablement.

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  • I thought that, if the described invention doesn't work, then the application fails to meet the requirement of utility, enablement, or both?
    – jdpatent
    Jan 17 '18 at 16:51
  • @jdpatent Of course an invention that doesn’t work should not receive a patent. I’m just stating reality.
    – Eric S
    Jan 17 '18 at 17:00
  • How about qualifying the statement "There is no burden to prove..."? I think this might mislead someone who lacks knowledge of the application process. As you know, there is a burden to convince the examiner that the invention works or else an application will be rejected. In many cases, this doesn't rise to the level of "proving" that the invention works, but it can (and it effectively does if the examiner simply asserts that the claimed invention isn't enabled and issues a rejection).
    – jdpatent
    Jan 17 '18 at 17:18
  • I'll +1 with a small change along those lines; I think this answer does a great job of reading between the lines and seeing what the question is really asking.
    – jdpatent
    Jan 17 '18 at 17:44
  • @jdpatent Do my edits meet with your approval?
    – Eric S
    Jan 17 '18 at 21:05

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