In reference to the patent: US20090199918

The adjustment knob 112 pulls up from a locked position to rotate for pressure adjustment and pushed down to return to locked position. This knob is used throughout the Dewalt product line including air compressors. The knob is cylindrical in design and has a slight taper towards the top making it difficult to grasp and pull out of the locked position. If I designed a replacement knob that is easy to grasp and pull for specific Dewalt products would that be a patent infringement.

  • This is an interesting question. The independent claims don't specify the knob shape. – Eric Shain Jan 14 '17 at 15:42

This patent has not been granted, it still is an application. That means it's claims = scope of protection can still change. It also means it might never get granted.

To check if you would infringe the patent that might get granted is therefore not possible yet.

From your description I cannot tell if you would infringe the claims as they are. For that you would have to compare the claims to your invention. If your invention falls under the exact wording of any claim you could potentially infringe the patent IF it gets granted and the claim remains.

As of now there are two independent claims:

A portable manifold assembly comprising:

a manifold structure having a longitudinal axis;

a male quick connect coupled in fluid connection with the manifold structure, the male quick connect being adapted to couple the manifold structure to a source of compressed air;

a plurality of female quick connects coupled in fluid connection to the manifold structure; and

a handle rotatably mounted on the manifold structure for rotation about the longitudinal axis of the manifold structure.

And

A portable manifold assembly comprising:

a first manifold portion adapted to receive a supply of compressed air at a first pressure;

a second manifold portion;

a handle coupled to at least one of the first and second manifold portions;

a regulator configured to transmit compressed air from the first manifold portion to the second manifold portion at a second pressure that is less than or equal to the first pressure, the regulator including an adjustment knob for selectively adjusting a magnitude of the second pressure, the adjustment knob having a longitudinally extending adjustment knob axis;

first and second female quick connects each having a connector body that is arranged about a longitudinally extending connector body axis, the first female quick connect being mounted on the first manifold portion and being configured to directly receive compressed air therefrom, the second female quick connect being mounted on the second manifold portion and being configured to directly receive compressed air therefrom;

wherein the adjustment knob axis is disposed between and parallel to the longitudinally extending connector body axes of the connector bodies of the first and second female quick connects

A quick search in Google shows there are several air regulators which have a knob similar to what is shown in the cited application. My guess is that DeWalt purchases the regulator from an OEM. The application's claims aren't claiming any particular feature with respect to the knob so I don't think it's all that relevant. There may however be other patents that exist for regulators that are relevant and they may not be DeWalt's.

Update: According to the US Public Pair, this applications status is "Abandoned -- After Examiner's Answer or Board of Appeals Decision" as of 5-22-2015.

  • The O.E.M. for the regulator is thb.com.tw/en/products/?method=detail&aid=66. They are located in Taiwan. They will not sell Dewalt regulator parts to anyone except them. – user18309 Jan 14 '17 at 19:55
  • I googled "air regulator locking knob patent" and discovered – user18309 Jan 14 '17 at 20:02
  • this patent US 5823023 A and US 4696320 A, They both have push pull locking ability but are not the Dewalt regulator. – user18309 Jan 14 '17 at 20:22

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