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A pro se provisional patent application has been submitted to the USPTO and the plan is to sharpen the provisional patent into a non provisional application.

I have received guidance that there EU authorities have strict requirements: if I were to learn as much as I could from the equivalent European Nolo book, I could either mod the USPTO non provisional to address EU requirements or fork the US application into an EU application.

Is there a European (EPC) equivalent or substitute for Nolo's "Patent it Yourself"?

I would like book guidance to write the first draft of the EU patent for an EU attorney. Before doing so, it would be helpful to understand the differences between US and EU patents.

If you have read \ used the equivalent please state this in the response and any lessons-learned. Thank you

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  • Am I to understand that you already have a US patent application drafted? If so, it might make a pretty good starting point for a EU attorney. – Eric S May 7 '18 at 16:38
  • A pro se provisional patent application has been submitted to the USPTO and the plan is to sharpen the provisional patent into a non provisional application. I have received guidance that there EU authorities have strict requirements: if I were to learn as much as I could, I could either mod the USPTO non provisional to address EU requirements or fork the US application into an EU application – gatorback May 7 '18 at 21:08
  • Thanks. On my patents the same attorney handled both the US and EU filings so it was pretty transparent to me. – Eric S May 7 '18 at 22:43
  • @EricShain Are we Alumni? – gatorback May 8 '18 at 2:04
  • No idea. Did you attend MIT? – Eric S May 8 '18 at 13:43
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No.

It's impossible to prove a negative, but I will say this: I've previously looked into this, and found nothing, whether for practitioners or pro se applicants.

There are some materials for the drafting exam of the EQEs (which all European patent attorneys have to have passed in order to qualify). However, they are typically structured for the purposes of passing an exam, and are probably a little dense and impractical for anyone not sitting an exam.

Otherwise, the best resource (in the sense that it's the only existing one) would likely be the websites of marketing-focused patent attorney firms. They all have their own range of articles about how to avoid common pitfalls in using a US application at the EPO. Hodgson Russ LLP has one which seems decent, for example. None really go into a huge amount of detail (because they don't want to give away their secrets), but it's something.

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