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A test and measurement system records data. Would it be better to indicate:

A test and measurement system that forwards data to a data store . (not a 'database').

OR is it 'good enough' to state:

A test and measurement system that saves data in a networked database.

I am concerned that the latter is too specific and a competitor could implement \ design a 'work-around' a narrow claim. I think that it is best to use broad terms in the claims and use more specific language to describe the system elsewhere (enablement). If this is incorrect or nuanced, I would like to understand why.

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That looks like a preamble to a claim. A claim would be "A test and measurement system that saves data in a networked database comprising: [then list the components and specifically how they fit together].

Or, if it is a method claim - "A test and measurement system that saves data in a networked database comprising the steps of [doing this, doing that, doing something else]

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When reading that I have four question:

What's the difference between test and measurement?

Do you need to do both always?

Whats's a networked database?

Why can't it save data elsewhere?

If you have perfect answers to all of those, you might be fine. If not, think again.

A claim is not about wording - okay, sure it is, but - it's about the content of the words. It doesn't matter if you describe your system with this word or that word or those words, what matters is having the facts straight.

Which are the completly necessary elements to distinguish your invention from the prior art, how are they defined (specifics go into the description, but it should be understandable from the claims) and how do they work together?

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