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I am trying to build and patent an elliptic curve-based encryption device. I am very new on this field and my 1st thought is what should I take care of?? Are encryption algorithms like ECC open source, so that I can use them? Is it as easy as buying a security book and 'transform' the encryption algorithms to code?

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    This question seems off-topic here. It isn’t about patents at all.
    – George White
    Apr 5 at 15:04
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    This site works best when you have a single specific question. For instance asking whether a specific encryption algorithm is patented. Perhaps you could edit your question?
    – Eric S
    Apr 5 at 15:17
  • I edited it.... Apr 5 at 17:34
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    Still not a question about patents other than to say patents can be for things that are a combination of already known, standard things. As long as you have a claim to something that is novel and not obvious (and "useful") you can get a patent even though sub-components of it are not novel.
    – George White
    Apr 5 at 22:12
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    Have you performed a patent search using the key words “elliptic” and “encryption”?
    – Eric S
    Apr 6 at 13:40

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Whether or not elliptic curve encryption is open source or not, there can still be patents. I did a search on Google Patents using the keywords "elliptic curve" and "encryption" and got more than 15,000 hits for granted patents. The number of US Patents is a slightly more manageable 5967.

Now it is quite possible that some of the patents are expired and others may have open source licensing which allows commercial use. Many more probably mention elliptic curve encryption as prior art but are patenting a different method. Figuring out freedom to operate would require a detailed analysis the patent art (including the even larger number of applications). Such an analysis would be beyond the scope of what I can provide. I would recommend reviewing the open source licensing terms for the software libraries you might use. Questions on licensing are off topic here but could be posted at the Law SE site.

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