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I have a question about how best to organize (rewrite) the titles of some patents that have been translated from Japanese, probably using machine translation. This is part of the translation of a website, and I need to make the titles sound natural in English.

In the machine translation, the second part of the patent title is worded as "using the same." For example,

"Keratin expression promoter, and composition for beautiful nails using the same"

"Liquid composition, and beverages and cosmetics using the same"

"Foam stabilizing agent, and cleaning agent using the same"

To me, the "using the same" part feels weird, so I want to change it to something along the lines of "produced therefrom", but could someone tell me how this is usually expressed in a patent title? Is "using the same" a valid term or am I right to find this strange?

Thank you for considering my question!

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  • I don’t see the problem with “using the same”. Patents aren’t written in natural English. They are legal documents.
    – Eric S
    Jul 19 at 15:35

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Many patents are for “a system and method”.

A system is a physical object and a method might be the steps or actions the system executes when turned on and enabled.

Claims to things are infringed by selling making or importing the thing. Claims to methods are infringed by operation of the system. Both types of claims are valuable. I think “and method” would be a good translation.

There can be claims to the steps to make a product as well as steps to use a product. In the examples you give I think it is a method of using not of producing. Google patents would let you search “system and method”.

Another type of method claim would be a method for making a device. If reading the patent and claims indicates that it includes a method for making something that would be more appropriate.

This question is about translating patent titles. I would be much more worried about translating claims. Claim wording can be a science and an art and translating a claim should also be viewed that way.

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