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Google Patents shows the details of US6034101 "Dosage form and method for administering drug."

However, on the USPTO website the same patent is listed as "WITHDRAWN".

I'm not familiar with the term "Withdrawn". What are the common circumstances under which a patent would be withdrawn and is this done by the applicant or by the USPTO?

2

According to the USPTO register the applicant failed to pay the issue fee. Therefore this patent will never be granted. But the applicant filed a bunch of other cases deriving from the same subject (one very recently). See my copy and paste from the register :

09/070,666 filed on 04-30-1998 which is Abandoned claims the benefit of 08/910,593 09/253,317 filed on 02-19-1999 which is Patented claims the benefit of 08/910,593 09/802,709 filed on 03-08-2001 which is Patented claims the benefit of 08/910,593 10/639,355 filed on 08-12-2003 which is Patented claims the benefit of 08/910,593 10/639,914 filed on 08-12-2003 which is Abandoned claims the benefit of 08/910,593 12/581,699 filed on 10-19-2009 which is Pending claims the benefit of 08/910,593 13/800,869 filed on - which is Pending claims the benefit of 08/910,593 13/801,000 filed on 03-13-2013 which is Pending claims the benefit of 08/910,593 10/638,977 filed on 08-12-2003 which is Pending claims the benefit of 08/910,593

1

It may be related to case where a court invalidated a different patent for the same treatment by the same company.

May 03, 2010

ALZA Corp. v. Andrx Pharmaceuticals, LLC (Fed. Cir. 2010)

By Andrew Williams --

Last week, in ALZA Corp. v. Andrx Pharms., LLC, the Federal Circuit affirmed the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware's decision that ALZA's patent related to treating Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder ("ADHD") was invalid for lack of enablement. ALZA markets the drug Concerta® for the treatment of ADHD, which releases methylphenidate after ingestion at an ascending rate over an extended period of time. Methylphenidate is the same active ingredient as found in Ritalin®. However, because Ritalin® is an immediate-release formulation, it had to be administered two to three times a day. And, as many of the patients that took Ritalin® were children, at least one of these doses had to be administered during the school day. As a result, there was a desire to create a once-a-day method of treating ADHD by developing a sustained or controlled-release dosage form, also known as an extended-release formulation.

ALZA undertook to create such a dosage form. It discovered after a series of clinical trials that MPH plasma concentrations that had ascending patterns had greater efficacy than when concentrations were constant. ALZA was able to use this information to develop a safe and effective once-a-day extended release oral dosage form. Subsequently, ALZA obtained U.S. Patent No. 6,919,373 ("the '373 patent"), whose only independent claim reads: "A method for treating ADD or ADHD comprising administering a dosage form comprising methylphenidate that provides a release of methylphenidate at an ascending release rate over an extending period of time." ALZA spent most of its effort developing an osmotic dosage form, and therefore the '373 patent specification focused on adapting osmotic systems to create ascending release dosage forms. However, the '373 patent did mention non-osmotic dosage forms.

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