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Hire a professional. 1) Neither question you ask can be answered with the information you gave, and even if you posted your application I doubt anyone would be willing to wade through it to give you an opinion for free. You have no idea how much effort what you are asking for requires, or what level of detail in the information you supply is required to ...


4

First I should note that the ratio in Alice, while easy to state, is rather hard to apply. Many words have been shed trying to characterise precisely what Alice-style abstractness really is. But the reality is, unless high courts rule further on this, we're left with working it out as we go. Nevertheless, I'm feeling brave, so I'll give it a go. For ...


3

My guess is that depending on the jurisdiction, yes you can patent an algorithm to predict sports outcomes. Whether you should is a different question. Eighteen months after you file an application it will publish which means everyone can see your algorithm. I'm assuming most people would use it for themselves such that it would be very difficult to prove ...


2

No. If a patent claim was so broad that manually performing the claimed algorithm by hand would infringe it, the patent claim would be invalid (and so could not be enforced). This is reasonably clear (in my view) from the line of US Supreme Court decisions beginning with Gottschalk v. Benson, 409 US 63 (1972), which provided: It is conceded that one may ...


2

As a preface to my answer, I have to stress that this is not really a settled area of law, and so it's impossible to give a confident answer. I can at best give my theory. A reader would need to consult with a good lawyer before going down this route. There are three types of infringement that are at issue here: direct infringement (35 USC § 271(a)), ...


2

To show something as "not new" there is no extra weight given to something really old. If it proceeds the priority date by a day, that's enough. If you look at the '587 patent you will see that most of the things mentioned in the article are cited on the face of the patent. That means they were taken into consideration by the examiner. You might note that ...


2

I'm not an expert in this nor a lawyer. My understanding is you can't patent an abstract mathematical algorithm in its own right. What you might be able to patent is the application of an algorithm to solving a specific problem. This is a bit of a moving target as there have been some recent legal decisions with regards to software patents. With regards to ...


2

Theorems are excluded from patentability. 35 U.S.C. 101 Inventions patentable. Whoever invents or discovers any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof, may obtain a patent therefor, subject to the conditions and requirements of this title. Emphasis added.


2

There is no technically correct answer under US law because the Supreme Court left patent eligibility a confusing mess. There is, however, a practical answer. The practical answer is to follow a "cover all possibilities" strategy. As a preliminary matter, consider filing in other countries where the law is better settled. Believe it or not, the patent ...


2

You need to look at whether you are simply describing how the patent functions or whether you are actually infringing the patent itself. You said you want to reproduce it in code - would that infringe a single independent claim of the patent? If so you are very likely infringing the exclusive rights granted to the patentee. However, some jurisdictions have ...


1

What you are asking about is patentability of software or algorithms. This is a tricky subject and there have been recent court decisions that have impacted this. I am not a lawyer but I do have a couple of algorithm patents. My best understanding is that in the US you can patent the application of a specific algorithm to a specific need. For instance, I ...


1

I am not a patent attorney so this advice is probably inadequate. That said, I do have several algorithm based patents so perhaps my insights are of value. My understanding is that abstract mathematical algorithms are simply not patentable. However, the use of an algorithm to solving a specific technical application may be patentable. If you are just ...


1

For patents issued before June 5, 1995 and which expired after that date, patent terms were either 17 years from the grant date, or 20 years from the application date whichever was later. This patent should have expired no later than September 5th, 1999. This is a pretty early software related patent. One of the issues with software patents is that patent ...


1

You cited a patent application rather than a granted patent. The granted patent corresponding to the application is US6859151B. Granted patents often have narrower claims than applications. Here is the first claim: A coding transformation method, used to transform an arbitrary input bit-string data into a sequence of printable ASCII characters, the ...


1

If your idea is novel and non obvious, you can consider filing a patent. It is probably a good idea to search for patents of the other players you mention and try to find other prior art. If you still think your idea is patentable, the next step is to discuss this with a patent lawyer. Doing your own prior art search and providing a detailed written ...


1

It is impossible to give a complete answer without carefully considering what the patent claims are and what your new code or product does. Since people here don't know about your project, they can't conduct the necessary analysis. However, dividing each video frame into a plurality of detection regions and applying the final filter to each region. ...


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