10

1999: General prior art on "progress indicators": http://www.mit.edu/~jtidwell/language/progress_indicator.html Relating to using animations: "Animation is often used to good effect in this pattern; motion draws the user's attention, and its cessation implies a new relaxed, stable state of being ("the process is done, so you can relax now")." 2006: ...


9

This is a pop fly if you know your image formats. Take for example the Progressive JPEG format, which is originally from ISO/IEC 10918, which dates to 1994: http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/formats/fdd/fdd000017.shtml This shows early pixels in a blocky format while the image continues to download. Progressive JPEGs weren't original either, they were ...


4

The essence of the claim seems to be that an image is slowly assembled, as an analogous process to another download that's occurring in the background. Creative progress indicators of this sort have been around for a very long time. Often they are used with games, where they are called loading screens. I suspect that searches under that keyword would be ...


3

How is this different than the grainy step by step downloads of large image files in web browsers? Near as I can tell, you could tell the progress based on how many of the pixels (which are the same color as the target download) had shown up and how much of the image was still missing.


3

In my opinion patent US20120105464, filed by Google on May 31, 2011 , shows the exact same image (see Figure 5). The only difference is that the cylinder in Apple's case has a radius of 0, so there would be no curve to the page turn. The other difference is that Google actually describes how the invention works, while Apple simply shows what it looks like. ...


2

I'd wager that if you sat and watched Pretty Loaded for long enough you'd find a loading animation that does precisely what they're describing.


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