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Do you want to leave it withdrawn or do you wish to cancel it? Those are two different states and you can chose to leave it withdrawn (easier to bring back after allowance if that is relevant) or cancel it (if you are not going to pursue in this application why not keep things cleaner and get rid of it).


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A single computer could be a system in that it has many interconnected parts working together - CPU, memory, storage, I/O. In the U.S. Particularly if the specification is explicit that some systems can consist of a single computer. I do not think a preamble of "one or more computers comprising a computer system" would have a problem with an examiner. Part ...


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You may have clarity problems if the examiner does not know what kind of system is that. If it is just one computer, you would have to claim a device/apparatus, if it is more than one computer you would have to claim a system comprising the computers. A system with one or more computers is not really OK because one computer does not qualify as a system if ...


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Any claim that is not either objected to or rejected is inherently accepted so they all need to be dealt with in the first office action. The independent claim might be non-novel or obvious but any of the dependent claims might add enough limitations to achieve patentablity. I strongly advise to not have that many claims. It might be annoying to the ...


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A patent has a preamble in its specification. The preamble is an introductory phrase to introduce the subject matter of the claims, defines a work concept or states of purpose or use of the invention. The preamble does not define the scope of invention rather it is an introduction to body of that claim which serves the function. The preambles can be of any ...


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In the U.S. having details in a preamble is usually not a good idea. During prosecution an examiner is likely to not credit the preamble as actually proving a limitation that helps you with patentablity. However, during an infringement proceeding a preamble might be given strong weight by a judge or jury.


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You might get an idea about this from an analogous case involving "a portion" of the backing of a baby changing table. It was ruled that "a portion" did not include "the whole" and the alleged infringer won. Now we write "at least a portion" in our claims.


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The use of semicolons and "and" is not actually required as far as I know, but it is customary to use them. You will find thousands of patents without them, using commas instead or periods (this one is wrong but examiners may not even object to such claims anyway), with no "and" either. I think there is no guide teaching how to use the "and", but what seems ...


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In the US, it depends on the case. In Europe, the preamble limits more or less depending on what is claimed: most of the times methods are limited by the preamble (please check out explanation in the "more" link), whereas devices/systems are limited such that they must be suitable for the stated purpose (please check out explanation in the "less" link). The ...


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