15

At a minimum, I'd think they do not have a valid claim to the auto capitalization. I haven't found anything on the auto-insertion of the period, but the claim for autocapitalization documented in claims 16(B)2, which is getting ready to capitalize the next string, and 16(C), which describes actually doing so, appears to have prior art: The Apple Newton, ...


13

Addressing the "transparency degree setting means" issue: I believe prior art is very clearly shown by Blender's Mist feature, which uses this technique and is documented here. That page is marked as modified in 2011, but the history goes back earlier; the use of adjusting transparency based on the distance is first mentioned in this version of the page from ...


11

Yes, Apple's patents here are undeniably based on prior art. I'll try to answer your question best by providing details for your points, and then follow up with links to the authoritative sources. Hope this helps! :-) Prior Art as an invention Touch screens are approximately 40 years old, first built by IBM. The first publicly available touchscreen was ...


11

Emacs has a feature for that (sentence-end-double-space). I checked out the sources from 1994 and this option was in fact there at that time. What happens when two spaces are encountered is configurable by the user, a period is not specified. It is however obvious by the name of the option that it signifies that the sentence has ended. From the EMACS ...


10

Prior art for this would appear to be OpenGL. Any version of OpenGL. Yes, even OpenGL 1.0, published in 1994. Let's take these in order: object placement means for placing a predetermined object in the virtual space; Yes, OpenGL can be used to do that. transparency degree setting means for, in accordance with a distance specified between (1) ...


10

This is precisely what the Radius Pivot display did. Here's a review of it published in 1990, and a video demonstration.


9

This seems an obvious development to stuff that opera were doing with their mini browser in 2007. In their version, you zoom to parts of the screen by tapping them. Evolving the Internet on your phone: Designing web sites with Opera Mini 4 in mind


9

It looks to me like the open-source xvkbd was performing precisely this function in 2000 - four years before the Microsoft #7,411,582 was submitted. However, it would only serve as prior art if it was usable on a touch surface? Does a touch-screen based X windows display running some UNIXy operating system count for this? I'm sure someone can show this ...


5

If you check Public PAIR you can see that the claims have changed drastically (see the 23rd page of the Appeal Brief filed 3-09-2011) since the application was published. It is also currently waiting a decision for the internal USPTO Appeal board as the Applicant appealed the examiner's rejection.


4

It would appear that any virtual keyboard would qualify under #7,411,582: "Soft input panel system and method.", and as the wikipedia article shows, even the general idea of intelligent work surfaces has been around since at least 1993, although if Microsoft's version is an improvement on that, it will not be relevant.


4

I don't think the right standard here is whether "double tap to zoom" has been done. Rather, it needs to be separated into two parts: have people used double-tap as a user interface input, and have people used zooming as a user interface verb? If you don't separate them, you might imagine an analogous "Ctrl+Q to search" patent. While it's unlikely that ...


4

Well, "everything" is maybe a little exaggerated. The independent claim clearly specifies a method for display 3D data which gets interactively divided into subregions. That said, the claim is certainly much too broad and relies on vague terminology such as "display rules" and "subregions" separated by a "boundary". Virtually any interactive 3D rendering ...


4

This shows how to calculate fog/mist with distance, such that objects merge with the background the further away you go: “Visual simulation of atmospheric haze”, P J Willis, Computer Graphics Forum, 6, 1, Jan 1987, pp 35-43.


3

Hitting the spacebar twice in succession to do something other than print 2 spaces was used in 1996 in a Frontier Elite flight plan generator: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:PYYBOEzBwNsJ:www.planetmic.com/orbit/ferfp.htm+&cd=8&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk From: http://www.planetmic.com/orbit/ferfp.htm Version release date: 08-...


3

Even if it's a recent thing SwiftKey keyboard on Android does that. Double tap on the spacebar will insert a period and next word will be capitalized. See FAQ here


3

To briefly answer some of your more general questions before diving into the weeds: If it is close enough that my idea would fall under this patent how do I go about opening dialogue for using parts of the patent in collaboration with my device. You'd want to contact the assignee and express interest in taking a license. In this case, that would be ...


3

I believe the application cited has been granted as the US patent US9672585B1. The assignee is Amazon Technologies, Inc. Claims are often changed considerably between an application and subsequent patent. You should carefully read the issued patent's claims to determine if you infringe on them. Remember, to infringe on a patent, you must implement every step ...


2

If the term "selection handles" covers what is sometimes called a "bounding box", then there is a lot of prior art for #6,891,551. Software has had resizable selection mechanisms for ages. Image and audio editors frequently have resizable selection boxes. I specifically remember an audio player for BeOS (this was back in the mid/late 90's) that used ...


2

According to the USPTO's PEAR database, the application was abandoned as of May 2011. The examiner rejected the claims based on obviousness in light US 5949643, which disclosed something similar. The patent disclosed two separate embodiments: one with an extendable touchpad, and another with hinges connected the screen to the base. The examiner felt it would ...


2

You are citing a published application. Was it granted? Were claims rejected or restricted on examination? It was granted as US 7408546 and appears to be currently valid with fees paid, and the claims still seem to be general. it looks as if the Examiners were not being sufficiently strict. Your only recourse seems to be to take professional advice and ...


2

Wordperfect back in the day on 80x24 DOS used to do this I think. I also remember some old 1980s word processors on the apple II that used to behave this way. Need to find some references..


2

The Source engine has support for fading "props", 3d models in levels, based on the distance. See the BaseFadeProp section of https://developer.valvesoftware.com/wiki/Prop_static for an example. It has publicly released support for stereographic rendering since earlier this year. This by the use of the Oculus devkit. The free to play game "Team Fortress 2" ...


2

The Nokia telephones as least as far back as 1995 had this feature while texting. Double-pressing the space character would insert a period and capitalize the first letter of the next word. This was a feature of the T9 predictive text input system, as documented here in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T9_(predictive_text)


2

Magic Carpet by Bullfrog used the same technique in 1994 to hide the limited rendering-powers of Pentium pcs... It was a cool way to make the more distant scenery disappear. I found the following review from 1994: The texture-mapped polygons are expertly depth cued and shade off into a beautiful mist effect in the near distance – this not only softens ...


2

Minecraft added its initial test support on 2009-08-13 for anaglyph 3D (anaglyph 3D is a form of stereoscopic 3D, as per the claims), and the fog that fades objects out as their distance from the camera increases predates at least 2009-05-20, since an option to modify the distance the fog is at was added on that date. This YouTube video of Minecraft, dated ...


1

Isn't this how a lot of games do LOD swapping, to cross-fade between a complex object and a simpler mesh (or texture billboard) as it got further from the camera? The earliest case I can clearly remember is the foliage in DICE's "Battlefield 1942" (published in 2002), but I'm sure there must be others.


1

This application relates to shading languages like Cg, GLSL, and HLSL. In particular, it's about executing fragment programs on a CPU rather than a GPU, which is not even vaguely novel. Shading languages have been around for decades, and can run on both CPUs and GPUs. The bullet points simply describe the obvious, straightforward approach to executing the ...


1

The Input Method Editor (IME) for the Japanese language in Microsoft Windows available in, as far as I know, Microsoft Windows 2000 onwards transforms characters entered in Hiragana into Kanji when the space bar is pressed once (i.e.) type Hiragana characters, press the space bar and you get Kanji. Anyone skilled in the art ......


1

has this patent been awarded already? Nope. It has not been awarded. Apple has just filed the application and the application has got published. The patent itself is not granted. You can check it out here. For the patent to be granted, after all the procedures, it takes few years. Can someone please tell me more about this. Assuming you are asking about ...


1

I agree with Plepleus and others that the claim is not just "sensing orientation and rotating the screen accordingly". Just for completeness' sake (and for search engines, etc.), "Sensing techniques for mobile interaction" (Hinckley et al., 2000) presents a mobile device that dynamically changes the orientation of screen content based on accelerometer ...


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