17

WIPO has a patent search interface that covers PCT applications and many national databases, including Europe, Japan, Korea, Russia, many Latin American countries, and more. I think all currently-applicable patents in these countries are covered, and there is additional historical data for some countries, but some of them only index metadata and abstracts, ...


11

According to the USPTO FAQ: Most patent applications filed on or after November 29, 2000, will be published 18 months after the filing date of the application, or any earlier filing date relied upon under Title 35, United States Code. Otherwise, all patent applications are maintained in the strictest confidence until the patent is issued or the ...


5

Try IP.com this is exactly what they do. U.S. Japanese, Chinese, European & Canadian; Patents, Applications, and Prior Art; in one free search.


4

You can use http://ipindiaservices.gov.in/patentsearch/search/index.aspx to search all patents in India including granted and published patent applications in India.


4

The Lens, started as Patent Lens 15 years ago, is open, free, no advertising (secure) and a public service. It searches in over 90+ jurisdictions and hosts 100M patent records. It is not just federated search, but comprehensive links, analysis, embedding and sharing of records, collections and annotations. It is run by a global social enterprise, Cambia ...


3

How good is your Japanese? This method only works using the Japanese portal for J-PlatPat. The English one omits the key link. Search for the patent using J-PlatPat. The three important fields are 特許出願番号 (for patent application numbers), 公開・公表特許公報(A) (for publication numbers) and 特許公報・公告特許広報(B) (for patent numbers). Click on the publication or ...


3

In my corporate life I used paid services such as Micropatent and TotalPatent. Of the free patent search tools, I prefer The Lens over Google patents. The Lens provides more fine grained control and if you register (completely free) provides useful additional features such as saved searches, search history and collections. In addition, I find The Lens ...


2

The biggest free patent information database is Espacenet like mentioned already. Bu there are many free databases. Depends what kind of information do you need. On of the best resources about patent information databases and search tools is Intellogist and their patent coverage map http://intellogist.com/wiki/Patent_Coverage_Map Select the country and you ...


2

There is no free global patent search system. There has been tremendous amounts of normalization of intellectual property law around the world through the World Intellectual Property Organization, but as of today there is no free service, governmental or otherwise, that can search the multitude of patent databases around the world.


2

DEPATISnet is the best option. It is a completely free database and belongs to German Patent Office. I have worked on the database for over three years and found that the result quality is as competitive as an expensive paid database like Thomson Innovation. Databases like Espacenet , Google Patents , etc. do not have proximity operators like "Word A and ...


2

The "WO" prefix indicates it is an international patent application, also called a PCT application, filed with the world intellectual property organization under the patent cooperation treaty. WO is in fact the code for WIPO (i.e. it doesn't just mean "World"), which you can see here: http://www.wipo.int/pct/guide/en/gdvol1/annexes/annexk/ax_k.pdf You can ...


2

If you would like to do a patent search, there are several free sites available. This answer describes my approach to searching and has links to some sites so you should read that first. Also, you should review this answer which will educate you on the patent system: Is this patent valid? Granted? Which countries does it cover? Are there family members?. ...


2

You can use the Google Patents Public Datasets (mirror), which can be accessed through Google BigQuery. For example, this query (its execution is free of charge): #legacySQL SELECT publication_number, assignee_harmonized.name, filing_date, country_code FROM [patents-public-data.patents.publications] -- WHERE UPPER(assignee_harmonized.name) LIKE 'ADOBE%' ...


1

Google patents, google books, google, patbase and library catalogues sometimes. I haven't seen any tools delivering (good/better) natural language results or anything like that (though many promise to). I'd love to be proven wrong on this one as a search is just tedious work, but as of now I haven't seen anything beat a good old search - understand ...


1

I'm pretty sure you can do this with the EPO site although I've never done it myself. Try this page for more information.


1

'poxoq for patents' is a search and retrieval tool which can be used to easily download publications in PDF format of granted patents, patent applications and utility models from over 90 countries. http://www.poxoq.com/ This might be worth trying altho the new license rules permit only the first 10 pages to be downloaded


1

A patent's coverage is defined by its claims. In particular, it is good to start by focusing on the independent claims (in this case claims 1, 13, 19, 24 and 27). Lets look at claim 1: A method for enabling interaction with a shared game data file using a game device, the method comprising: providing logic to perform one or more actions ...


1

According to The Lens' support pages: The lens supports exporting of metadata for up to 1000 search results or 10,000 collection items. You can access the export function via its icon on the result listing header or from the “Collections” tab of the Work Area. When exporting from the result listing header, the export function takes into account ...


1

It is not clear from your answer that the number format you need to enter at the search form is the latter (1142/MUMNP/2007). In India there are two numbers which are useful for identifying a patent (or application): the application number and the patent number. Until 31.12.2015 the numbering system for applications was NNNN/OFF/YYYY or NNNN/OFFNP/YYYY (NP ...


1

According to the CPC classification, which is used by the EPO and USPTO, you may find groups of classification that fits into lifesciences, namely the group C (Chemestry). There is no specific classification for lifesciences. Thus you have to filter what groups apply. Then you may use Esp@cenet, the biggest world repository of patent publications, and then ...


1

I think any of the usual patent search sites may be able to help with this. I particularly like The Lens, but patents.google.com or www.freepatentsonline.com/search.html would do as well. The secret is to use classification codes to define the field of search. Here are links for US and international codes. Classification codes are complex and generally more ...


1

There are two aspects to patentability: novelty and non-obviousness. Novelty relates to whether anyone else has applied the same solution previously. I can't answer that question in this case, but the patent examiner didn't find significant enough prior art to invalidate the claims. Second is non-obviousness. Your own reaction to this patent where you state "...


1

This is opinion based and I'm an inventor, not a patent attorney. I have done my fair bit of patent searching. In my previous job I've used both Micropatent and Totalpatent both of which are paid services. In addition, I've used the USPTO site, Espacenet, Google Patents and The Lens. I'd say in general the free sites are just fine. The Lens is especially ...


1

I'm guessing there is some way to do this with Google Scholar, but haven't discovered it yet. If you try The Lens, you can do something close by searching on a term relevant to the article you are looking for and then trying to find the article in the "Cited Articles" option and selecting it. In addition, there seems to be a new capability at The Lens ...


1

I recently came across a beautiful public tool which shows patents (currently indexed) citing research article. I have not tested in details but seems to work for me. I also believe it doesnot list all the patents but nice way to start. this requires following steps:- Search your citation in NCBI PUBMED. Locate the reference in list of result. open the ...


1

http://www.patentsview.org/ is probably what you are looking for. IT has this data available as a large download or as an API service. It's always a little bit out of data but should work for some use cases.


1

For assignee information the USPTO has that data in XML form. To relieve their servers they have a deal with Reed Tech. to host the data, unchanged and for free. Look at http://patents.reedtech.com/assignment.php


1

It will only show your patents. You can't use it to access unpublished applications filed by others.


1

Getting this or any issued U.S. patent's claims narrowed or all of its claims made null can be done in one of two proceedings at the USPTO called an ex parte reexamination or an Inter Parte Review. The least expensive is the ex parte reexam. The filing fee is a minimum of $6000 for an ex parte petition. That is just the filing fee, you will also want ...


1

You can use Google Patent Search to conduct free patent searches. It contains more than 87 million patents from 17 patent offices. Added to that, its sleek UI and some functionalities that help you find a prior art in non-patent literature makes it a go to source to conduct a free patent search. Type patents.google.com in the address bar of your browser ...


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