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You can download bulk patent data from USPTO: Bulk Data Storage System. Look for Patent Grant Full Text Data. Google used to collect patent data and provide bulk download, but they discontinued the bulk download project because USPTO provides the bulk data now directly. But you can still download bulk packages of what Google has collected prior to ...


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You should use the date of the A1 or A2 publication for the earliest publication date of the subject-matter (of the application). (If you want to know about the granted patent please clarify.) A1 is a publication of the application with search report (SR). A2 is the publication without SR. There will be always only one or the other. An A3 is published later ...


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There is PACER, but it's not free. And there is search.rpxcorp.com (used to be free) - patent litigation search. You 'll just need to register an account for that.


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First, choose a right category for the patent document to be downloaded (patent or patent application, invention or utility model, etc.) Second, put a registration number into the search field (number only, no RU prefix). Third, find and click a publication link (usually in the upper left region of the screen); note that earlier publications may not be ...


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The documents are submitted by the applicants in writing or pdf. Getting text from them requires OCR, there's no way around that.


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Yes, they get sent to the assignee. It is just a card stock cover stapled to the same patent you can print out online. It does have a cool ribbon glued to it and is sometimes called the "ribboned copy". These things used to be like a deed and were kept in corporate safes but are now a relic without any power. Some countries have done away with them while ...


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You can go to https://worldwide.espacenet.com/?locale=en_EP and enter the patent number in the Smart Search tab.It will retrive you the result (there is no title dispayed, probably because this is an old patent). Click on the result and then you can retrieve the pdf as the "original document". Espacenet has a large collections of patent documents, from ...


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Might it be worth anything? It's probably not worth a whole lot. According to my searches, John W. Cuthbert is not notable enough to have a Wikipedia article about him, nor are his contributions to air compressors widely enough recognized for his name to be associated with "air compressor history" in Google searches. Nearest comparable I can find on eBay ...


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