5

The patent description needs to be sufficiently detailed to permit "one of ordinary skill in the art" to replicate it. I don't recall having seen a patent without any drawings - particularly for inventions involving electronic circuits. The figures help to set context - worth a thousand words and all that. Look at the figures in a few other patents and ...


3

I would add to User96's good answer that the description of the patent must also show that the inventor had "possession" of the invention (though the courts have been somewhat unclear in defining possession). So a diagram or drawing can help with that as well. In general if it would help in understanding your invention, you should strongly consider ...


3

I hope this is helpful. Ask Patents is not part of the USPTO but is just a group of volunteers trying to provide patent information to the general public. Our answers are not authoritative. The USPTO does have a department of people specifically to work with the offices of other countries. It is called the Office of International Patent Cooperation. A link ...


3

The effects of granted patents (including European patents) in Germany are defined in the Patentgesetz. Relevant for your question is probably §11.1, according to which non-commercial activities in the private area are not affected by patent protection. In any case, according to §9, patents only concern activities such as the production, sale or use of a ...


2

I would recommend keeping drawings at a higher level (block diagrams, etc) whenever possible. If you get too specific, you risk running into problems if you ever tweak your design. For example, you might discover that it's cheaper to use two 10k resistors in series instead of one 20k resistor, or you might have to source a part from a different ...


2

In general, patents contain simple block-diagrams which articulate the key features of the device or mechanism you wish to patent. If the key feature of your idea is embodied in a specific circuit (for the sake of argument, with say 10 components or less) then a circuit diagram is probably appropriate. If on the other hand, it's going to involve several op-...


2

A US patent is still possible until one year after the first publication. Not many other countries offer this though - and with different time frames. To the risk, well, if your product is easily copyable, it might be copied. On the other stuff, yes, patents aren't cheap and can be discouraging and there is no promise that your application will be granted. ...


1

Your reasons for not filing are understandable but have no bearing on patentbility. You say that it has been exposed to many people. As another answer mentioned, for a U.S. patent there is a (limited) 1 year grace period from the first publication. The grace period is also started by a public exposure, demonstration, sale, and offer for sale. Public ...


1

First and foremost make sure the employment agreement you have with the freelancer makes clear that you will own all intellectual property that comes about as a result of the work. It is likely that the designs and schematics will not be eligible for a patent. To obtain a patent an idea must be novel, non-obvious and useful. If the freelancer is simply ...


1

There is a potential danger that the student can be held liable for indirect or contributory infringement. This is the act of providing means that are essential for performing the infringing act while it was known or would be obvious that these means would be used for the infringing act. Of course - concurring with Dr. Falken - such an activity of providing ...


1

Without detailed information about your novel device it's not possible to advise you. It's better to contact with some US patent attorney (if you are planning to file US patent application).


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