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A certified letter to both the company and their patent attorney/agents explaining these circumstances should put them on notice that your colleague is indeed reachable and intends to exert his interest in the particular invention. Lawyers have a duty to report matters of fact to the USPTO that affect the case and if they have filed that he is unreachable ...


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First and foremost make sure the employment agreement you have with the freelancer makes clear that you will own all intellectual property that comes about as a result of the work. It is likely that the designs and schematics will not be eligible for a patent. To obtain a patent an idea must be novel, non-obvious and useful. If the freelancer is simply ...


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I am not a lawyer, but I have 30 years of working in industry and quite a few patents all of which are the property of my employers. I don't think you can get a definitive answer on this site as each company may have its own employment policies. In general, the rule of thumb is if you are being paid for the work, the work product (which includes inventions) ...


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I have to sign this 37 CFR 1.63 and acknowledge I am the inventor? I doubt anyone can force you to sign anything. The question really is why wouldn't you want to. If you are the inventor why not take some credit? I suppose you could be trying to punish you old company, but having a patent on your resume is a plus. If they are willing to foot the bill to ...


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Assignments may be differently worded; but you very likely assigned full title and ownership. If the assignee wants to waste the patent opportunity it’s their right. Actually, the assignee may have decided that going the trade secret approach would provide a better return than a patent. The facts of this situation may support this theory. But you did ...


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