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4

The first date (2002-06-17) is the filing date, US10173363 is the application number. The second date (2003-03-04) is the date of issuance of the patent, and US6529620B1 is the patent number. And, yes, the patent has expired for not paying renewal fees, since 2015. The words "expired-fee related" in that order simply means that the patent although granted, ...


3

Before we answer the question, you should be aware that the cited application US20140312193A1 is a full patent application and not a provisional application. Patent applications don't expire. Rather they are either granted or rejected. The definitive site to determine the status of a US patent application is the US Public Pair. For this case, get past the ...


2

"WO" is the two letter country code for PCT applications. As for patents in other territories, an application is first given an application number and then a separate publication number. In fact, these two numbers you mention relate to the same application (application number PCT/CA2004/001083 was published as WO 2005/006842). An International Patent ...


2

It really depends on whether your similar idea has new, non-obvious idea as part of it. If so, you might be able to get patent coverage for the new and presumably improved part. What is covered by the expired patent is available to be used by anyone without licensing and your new patent wouldn't change that. You should, however, perform a search of similar ...


1

It looks like the Korean application never became a patent and the WO number is for the PCT application. PCT applications need to enter the national stage in one or more countries to actually become a patent. I do not see that this ever entered the U.S. national stage Patents are territorial. Other than some odd cases, they only constrain actions within the ...


1

There are a surprising number of patents related to poker side bets. Based on my Googling, I'm guessing the patent you are referring to is US6012719A. It has a priority date of 7-22-1994 and was issued on 1-11-2000. Patents filed before June 8, 1995 expire either 20 years from their priority date or 17 years from their issue date which ever is later. As you ...


1

That patent was issued in 1979 and expired 17 years later. The rules changed in 1995 and now patents expire 20 years from their priority date which is usually the filing date.


1

Most patents from 40 years ago will be expired now. But there are three points which might still forbid the usage of the process: Newer patents on improvements - there could still be patents for parts of the method patented later. If every part of it was known exactly like it is now 40 years ago, this is unlikly, if not, it's entirely possible. 40 years ago ...


1

Since this patent was filed prior to June 8th, 1995, the term of the patent was 17 years from the date of ISSUANCE, not filing date. Thus if it went through a long examination period, which was common back then (prosecution periods of five or more years were not uncommon), the patent could still be in effect and enforceable. Also, any continuation patent ...


1

Patent 4,176,410 at least is long dead (i.e. very expired). Of course, there could be other patents out there to worry about, but 4,176,410 is not a problem for you. You can see when this patent expired using the USPTO Patent term calculator. If you do decide to file your own patent, however, be sure to cite 4,176,410 so that the examiner can look at it ...


1

No, the idea is not patentable anymore. Once any person anywhere publishes knowledge on how to create the invention (whether publishes it in a patent, online, in a novel, etc...), the idea can no longer be patented. Clerks at patent offices have to review many sources (generally patent offices in other countries, existing patent applications, engineering ...


1

You can patent a new and improved version of your original patent if the novel claims are not obvious from your prior patent and the other prior art.


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