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Application The life cycle of a patent starts with the application. The inventor files this application with a patent office, for example the USPTO (US Patent and Trademark Office). This grants them the right to say "patent pending", but no enforceable protection rights. Everyone can file a patent application, containing basically everything (apart from ...


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The first date (2002-06-17) is the filing date, US10173363 is the application number. The second date (2003-03-04) is the date of issuance of the patent, and US6529620B1 is the patent number. And, yes, the patent has expired for not paying renewal fees, since 2015. The words "expired-fee related" in that order simply means that the patent although granted, ...


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I agree with the answer from @Eric Shain. I would add one nuance. At least in the U.S. there is a derivation proceeding that allows one to challenge an earlier filed application of another on the grounds that they stole it from you. In that case any evidence of when you invented could be material. To win you not only need to show you invented it prior to the ...


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It takes about 6 weeks from payment of issue fee until the patent issues. IF you wait to the last minute to pat the issue fee, the patent will probably issue in fewer weeks. In the U.S. there are no maintenance fees due until after the patent is granted. All of the maintenance fees are then keyed off the grant date. The priority date is irrelevant. They ...


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I am not a lawyer, so my answer is quite possibly wrong. That said, I have had documents notarized and in every case, the notary was only verifying that I willingly signed the document and know what I'm signing. The notary didn't even read the document. The following quote is from this site. A notary public is a public official appointed by a state ...


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Prior to 1995, it was normal practice to get potentially patentable ideas witnessed, signed and dated. This was what we did at my job. This was because in the US the USPTO used to have a first to invent system for determining inventorship. However, since 1995, the USPTO went to a first to file system (aligning with most other countries). Thus, having a ...


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No, notarization is a way to show that your signature is your signature. It has nothing to do with public disclosure. To prevent others from patenting the same idea, from a practical point of view, you would need to make your disclosure in a way that an examiner would find it during a search. From a broader point of view, the submission you mentioned in a ...


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Yes - The key issue is "with a priority date that is less than a year ago". The date of the grant is a non-issue. As mentioned in a comment by OP @Keir Finlow Bates a US patent can issue very quickly. It could be a Track I or moved to the front of the queue due to age or ill health. And Yes, they get the same priority date as the US application. As @...


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Without seeing the file on the case, some important points that might be helpful are - (1) The USPTO should have required signed declarations from each person listed as an inventor stating that they consider themselves collectively to be true inventors and understand their responsibilities to the patent office. However, there are ways around this. (2) ...


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If you're working with a patent lawyer, you should speak with her or him about this because this is the kind of thing that patent lawyers are quite good at navigating. Here is the way to think about patent claims: The independent claim must stand on its own. The claim must be novel, not obvious, useful, and must satisfy the section 101 requirements for ...


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