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7

According to http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/ac/ido/oeip/taf/issuyear.htm: The current patent numbering system began with a patent issued on July 13, 1836. Prior to that date, 9,957 patents had been issued. These 9,957 patents before patent US1 include the first U.S. patent, which was numbered X1 or X000001. It was granted on July 31, 1790 to Samuel ...


6

In 1972 the US Supreme Court decided the case of Gottschalk v. Benson, which addressed the then-controversial idea of whether or not the software implementation of an algorithm for converting decimal numbers to binary could be patented. The algorithm itself was very straightforward (simple enough that lawyers could explain the thing in its entirety in a few ...


4

Russian patent system was officially launched in 1812 by Imperator Alexander I in his "Chartered Rights Manifesto", however some patent-like preferences were used since 1748. The patent legislation was updated in 1833, 1870, 1896, 1900, and 1912. A Letter Patent might be issued for 15 years and could be challenged by a third party. After Revolution of 1917 ...


2

You have a lot of interesting questions, and the subject of patent term length is actually very important to the tech industry. I would suggest the paper An Empirical Study of the Twenty-Year Patent Term by Mark Lemley (he's a huge scholar in the field of patent law). The paper itself will answer many of your questions; if not, you will most likely find the ...


2

Patents were systematically granted in Venice as of 1450, where they issued a decree by which new and inventive devices had to be communicated to the Republic in order to obtain legal protection against potential infringers. The period of protection was 10 years. These were mostly in the field of glass making. As Venetians emigrated, they sought similar ...


1

I can't provide historical context for the reason 20 years is the term for utility patents, but I can say that it didn't originate in the US. Up until June 8, 1995 the term for US patent was 17 years from the grant date. In an effort to align with the system from most other countries, the US adopted the 20 years from application date standard. Since it ...


1

No. Ownership is largely independent of inventorship, as patents can be sold, traded, and gifted just like any other form of property.


1

You can see the complete patent case file from the U.S. Patent Office at the National Archives at Kansas City. These files normally contain the applicant's oath, original specifications, and communication between the patentee or patentee's attorney and the patent office. The link should take you to the National Archives online catalog page for Patent Case ...


1

Patent sale date can be determined in following ways:- Check the respective patent office Patent Register e.g. US patent USPTO Assignment Database Check online News Articles or Press releases. Contact the attorney of the Application Contact the inventor/applicant of the application Now to query you cannot find it in online database as case is too old and ...


1

Yes, this means that a model was submitted or presented by the inventor. Patent models were required in the US from 1790 to 1880, but the rules have since changed. If no models was provided, then early patent drawings specifically state "(No Model.)" For example, the next patent (US257886) states ("No Model.)" indicating a model was not provided. Based on ...


1

I attended a seminar last month about Patent and Intellectual property issues. One of the speaker from Patexia discussed the history of patent and cited some countries. One of the countries mentioned was Russia. FIY, Russia has a "first-to-file" patent system. Russian patent law is fairly comprehensive, offering protection to most products and technologies.


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