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Can I describe two different ideas inside a provisional patent application? Yes. Indeed, you could do this in any application, whether provisional or non-provisional: there is no restriction on what can be described. The restriction on multiple inventions is provided by 37 CFR 1.141(a), which provides: (emphasis added) Two or more independent and ...


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As some other answers have suggested, there are two major requirements that are relevant to your question. The two requiresments are: novelty and nonobviousness. (Nonobviousness is a U.S. term; in Europe this is referred to as inventive step.) To earn a patent, your invention must pass both tests. In your case, the invention passes the test of novelty ...


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If they are ideas and not actual data, they are most likely not patentable. You cannot patent a theory, you can patent an actual method, a technical process, etc. Even if this fact is disregarded, if you disclosed the content of your emails in your blog, they are publicly available and thus prior art. Anything that belongs to prior art cannot be patented.


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There's two aspects here. For one, in many countries, especially the US, you're required to disclose the inventor truthfully. Not doing that could suffice to invalidate the patent or you could sue for it to be transferred to you, etc, depending on location. But let's put that aside as it's a lot of work and proving etc. The subject matter of a patent ...


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Without having specific details, my sense is you can't protect your idea. In the past, it was possible to patent purely abstract ideas such as "a computing device that is mobile" but this led to widespread patent abuse, and changes in the guidelines and eligibility standards. However, if your idea is specific, meaning a new method of doing something with ...


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Patents and copyright in the context of software cover different aspects of your product. You would want to consider both. Since this very much turns precisely on your idea, you really ought to go see an attorney. A patent covers the inventive concept. That is, you can obtain a patent if you have an invention which is novel and non-obvious (and patent-...


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"Business Ideas" cannot be patented, only novel processes that are not deemed wholly abstract. Thus, if you had a design for a new type of engine, you could seek a patent. But if you had an idea for a new type of business, such as an app that utilizes the Uber model to utilize ride sharing for delivery services, it would not be patent eligible.


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A US patent is still possible until one year after the first publication. Not many other countries offer this though - and with different time frames. To the risk, well, if your product is easily copyable, it might be copied. On the other stuff, yes, patents aren't cheap and can be discouraging and there is no promise that your application will be granted. ...


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Your reasons for not filing are understandable but have no bearing on patentbility. You say that it has been exposed to many people. As another answer mentioned, for a U.S. patent there is a (limited) 1 year grace period from the first publication. The grace period is also started by a public exposure, demonstration, sale, and offer for sale. Public ...


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If, in your example, Apple filed for the patent before you commercialized your idea then yes you can be sued for infringement. It doesn't matter if you thought of the idea independently or even before the patent filing. If, however, you commercialized or even publicly disclosed your invention prior to Apple's patent application date, then it would constitute ...


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Typically, one would file a Provisional patent before pursuing a Non-Provisional patent. The requirements for the successful submission of a Provisional Patent are listed on the USPTO.gov website under the Provisional Patent section. These include Technical Specs, Technical Drawings, etc.


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Can I patent the same idea with my own methodology? You can obtain a patent incorporating the same idea as long as your own methodology is a non-obvious improvement over the prior art (including but not limited to that specific competitor's patent). The claims will have to include some of the methodology details to render them non-obvious. Is it illegal ...


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Determining whether or not an innovation is novel is usually based on a novelty search. This means performing a comprehensive search of the prior art, which includes not only existing products, but also patents, patent applications, and other published literature. Many patents and applications never result in an actual product, so there may be prior art ...


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If the all the characteristics of your invention are not found in one prior art single document then your invention is considered new. However, it might not be considered inventive if the combination of all these characteristics would be considered something straightforward to the skilled man in that technology area. As you might suspect this has to be seen ...


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First - the word "idea" equals "not patentable" - stay away from the word idea. Concept is a much better word to use. Some concepts include a basic implementation and can be patented without you knowing exactly what the dimensions are, the material to use to make it economically. Or you might hire someone to supply non-inventive enablement help. On the other ...


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I believe the answer to your question is no, there is no way to know if a patent application is related to a hackathon. I have helped file patents from hackathons and there is nothing different that would be detectable in the patent itself. In fact, many companies would be unlikely to be able to tell you if the patent was part of a hackathon or not, unless ...


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