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The Lens, started as Patent Lens 15 years ago, is open, free, no advertising (secure) and a public service. It searches in over 90+ jurisdictions and hosts 100M patent records. It is not just federated search, but comprehensive links, analysis, embedding and sharing of records, collections and annotations. It is run by a global social enterprise, Cambia ...


6

Your attorney will have to be admitted to practice before the USPTO (pass the patent bar) before he will be able to submit the patent on your behalf. Otherwise the US patent laws do not discriminate against foreign nationals filing on their own behalf. See generally: http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/doc/general/foreign.htm You can always hire a US ...


6

A brief answer is that the Paris Convention was an international agreement (dating back to the late 1800's) wherein participating countries respect the priority date of patents (and some other forms of IP as well) first filed in other participating countries. So an inventor filing a patent in America, for example, would have up to 12 months to file the ...


5

In short, yes. While the "corporate veil" protects an individual from personal liability in many instances, this isn't always the case when dealing with infringement of intellectual property. A few ways the director may be held personally responsible include: (1) The court pierces the corporate veil. If the company is undercapitalized, is used to commit ...


5

In Rozenblat v. Sandia Corp. 69 USPQ2d 1474 (7th Cir 2003), the Seventh Circuit held that an inventor's patent drawings may be protected by copyright. This case is frequently cited when addressing this question and usually has been interpreted to mean only that it is possible for a patent drawing to be protected by copyright. The U.S. Patent and Trademark ...


5

I suppose you mean that you have filed a patent application in UK (not granted yet) and want to seek protection in US as well. If such is the scenario, the reply is yes, there is a way out for a UK patent application to be recognized in US. In order, to have a patent in US for the same invention (that was filed in UK) one has to file a patent application in ...


5

Regarding the first question - will I be able to do anything about it since I filed for a patent in US and Canada first? There is always scope for invalidating the patent granted in China. In order to invalidate the Chinese patent using your patent application, your application should have been published before the effective filing date of the Chinese patent....


5

Yes, you can sell patented inventions in other countries. You just can't manufacture, import, distribute, or sell patented products in countries where the invention is patented. If the patent owner catches you doing any of those 4 deeds, the patent owner can get an injunction to stop you and sue you for lost profits. In some countries, the owner can sue you ...


4

Regarding "if the Canadian guy's patent is rejected, can I try", I assume you mean "can I try to patent it". The answer is no, insofar as what you want to patent is contained in (or obvious in light of) his patent application. You can only get a patent for something that is new, not something that is already in public knowledge (e.g. published for all to ...


4

A pending patent application does not provide the owner with any enforceable exclusionary rights to stop others from making, using, offering for sale, selling or importing the claimed invention. So, you cannot be sued for infringement until a patent issues, if ever. When a patent application is laid open (published) in Canada, the prosecution history (the ...


4

DEPATISnet is the best option. It is a completely free database and belongs to German Patent Office. I have worked on the database for over three years and found that the result quality is as competitive as an expensive paid database like Thomson Innovation. Databases like Espacenet , Google Patents , etc. do not have proximity operators like "Word A and ...


4

To add to the previous answer of Dr. Falken with respect to the question whether others could file a patent application for the same invention in countries where you have not filed yourself the following should be noted. First of all your application will normally only publish 18 months after your filing (or, if applicable, your priority date). As Dr. Falken ...


4

Patents are jurisdiction specific. Hence any patent filed in the U.S will protect your invention only in the U.S. Different countries follow their respective law set forth to be taken into consideration for granting a patent. If you wish to seek patent protection for your invention in multiple countries then you can adopt the PCT (Patent Cooperation Treaty) ...


4

This is why the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) exists. A patent application filed as PCT may be filed in other member states. There is a good overview of PCT filing here, and more authoritative information can be found at WIPO, especially in this overview figure. I strongly recommend finding a patent agent who can step you through this process.


4

Application The life cycle of a patent starts with the application. The inventor files this application with a patent office, for example the USPTO (US Patent and Trademark Office). This grants them the right to say "patent pending", but no enforceable protection rights. Everyone can file a patent application, containing basically everything (apart from ...


4

Important to add that patents are territorial rights. Patents with No US-N,NNN,NNN are US patents with effect only to the US. JP is for Japan, CA is for Canada, etc etc When you see WO-YYYY-NNNNNN this is a patent application filed and published via the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). They never mature to patents. They are only used as a ...


3

Obtaining a patent in any given jurisdiction (US / EU / Japan etc.) will only secure you rights within the geographical limits of that jurisdiction. It has no immediate effect whatsoever anywhere else. However, a patent application filed in one place can be claimed as priority for an application elsewhere. For instance, you could file in the US and then ...


3

You can use Google Patent Search to conduct free patent searches. It contains more than 87 million patents from 17 patent offices. Added to that, its sleek UI and some functionalities that help you find a prior art in non-patent literature makes it a go to source to conduct a free patent search. Type patents.google.com in the address bar of your browser ...


3

Granted, enforceable patents are territorial limited. So a U.S. patent allows its owner to control the making, selling, using and importing into the U.S. In this case you are referencing an application that may or may not have resulted in one or more U.S. patents (looks like it hasn't as of March 2013). The inventor could have filed counterpart applications ...


3

Patents and patent applications are published with a two-letter code specifying the office that published it. Patents and patent applications with a EP code have been published by the European Patent Office while patents and patent applications with a national code (e.g. DE) have been published by the corresponding national office. Like any other office, ...


3

The PCT Applicant's Guide (National Phase) is the resource you are looking for. It contains a detailed guide on the WIPO Rules and Articles from the Applicant's perspective, and covers the time limits in detail, with pointers to information on exceptions for certain patent offices and explanations on how to address delays. From the table linked via the ...


3

Check out the Wikipedia article on the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT). It includes search authorities from countries including China and Russia. Also, you can search Google Patents for patents from around the world which are often countries with different economic systems (China and Russia as major examples). Finally, Cooperative Patent Classification (...


3

You have referred to a US patent (and application). This is only effective in the US, and therefore could not apply in other countries. In addition, by searching for the inventor's name at INPI, it appears that no related Brazilian patent exists. It therefore appears at first blush that this patent (or any equivalents) would not prevent you manufacturing ...


3

In every country, prior art must be published (that is, available to the public). An expired provisional patent application which has not been used for priority is not available to the public: that is, even a motivated member of the public could not obtain a copy. Therefore it is not prior art, and you are correct in your thinking. Incidentally, while I'm ...


3

Amendment under Article 34 PCT is only possible if you are proceeding to International Preliminary Examination. Is this the case? Furthermore, if you only intend to proceed to EPO, is there any special reason you want to amend the claims now and not within the EP phase? Provisional protection perhaprs? I just want to make sure that you are aware of the fact ...


3

Thanks for all the comments. Answering my own question. I first called the number of the Pre-Grant Publication Division at (703)605-4283 according to the SB/36 form, but that number turned out already invalidated. I then called the Application Assistance Unit (AAU) at 571-272-4000. After waiting for more than one hour, I finally reached to someone and they ...


3

Especially in the U.S., correct inventorship is important. Co-inventors are not strictly analogous with co-authors. In the U.S., all true inventors must be listed. An inventor is someone who makes a conceptual contribution to something that is claims. The only legitimate reasons to remove an inventor would either be for them to decide that you were listed ...


2

In the US, the AIA amended the rules to allow third parties to submit prior art during prosecution. MPEP 1134.01 Third Party Submissions Under 37 CFR 1.290 [R-11.2013] Third parties can submit prior art by the later of: 1) within 6 months of publication of the application; or 2) before the first Office Action. If for some reason there is a Notice ...


2

If by saying "in the end" you mean eventually as opposed to the suffix at the end of the number then: The EPO publishes applications filed with it and it publishes patents granted by it. At this moment in time, EP patents are not enforceable in any court. An EP patent can be "validated" as a UK patent, DE patent etc. and then be enforceable in the courts of ...


2

This features is available using skeinforge. "Empty Layers Only When selected, support material will be only on the empty layers. This is useful when making identical objects in a stack." http://fabmetheus.crsndoo.com/wiki/index.php/Skeinforge_Raft#Support_Material_Choice


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