10

We wanted to make sure the protocol was as widely deployable as possible. We knew that patents are encumbrances on technology adoption, so of course we didn't want patents at all. Further, we knew the rules of the standards bodies, and that if the protocol ever were to be adopted, patents are just a headache and a barrier. Given these goals - patenting ...


4

Did Microsoft file aggressively, or defensively? Those patents long predate SPDY, so the question of "aggressively or defensively" is moot. I think Microsoft, as a participant in the IETF standards process, is simply following it's duty in disclosing any patents they own that might have a bearing on this protocol. Given how broadly the claims are written up,...


3

Consider an example, a patented software invention in the United States covering a “improving the financial transaction” method and system. A competitor enables users in the United States to download an application onto a mobile device. The user accesses the application to browse through products. The activity of the user is sent to a server located in India....


3

My best advice is to ask other inventors you know. Also, the top person in town is very unlikely to edit and finalize patent applications written by the inventor. It's like the mechanic's sign: $50/hour, $60 if you watch, $80 if you help.


3

Seeing that your profile says you're in Palo Alto and affiliated with Stanford, I think you could probably find a good patent attorney just by driving up and down Page Mill Road, or asking some of your colleagues. But perhaps you were looking for something more? One approach is to look at successfully asserted or widely-licensed patents in your field and ...


2

I will attempt to answer in brief. First-off on protocols. Protocols as such cannot be patented [good reference required], just like the case of standards. Standards cannot be patented, but the catch is, technologies used in a standard could be patented. An example is the MPEG-2 standard that incorporates many patents. So, SPDY protocol as such cannot be ...


2

This particular case was is listed as Closed in Posttrial as of January 3, 2013. It appears as though each of the defendants settled out of court. One source for finding information on patent litigation is RPX, and information on this particular case can be found here. You can create a free account to access all the information, including the docket ...


1

According to USPTO PAIR, patent 6,098,180 (application 08/804,114), "ROBUST DELIVERY SYSTEM", is listed as "patented case". Fees appear to have been paid, and the patent therefore appears to be in force. The corresponding European Patent application (publication number EP1026866), "Robust File Transfer System", has been withdrawn following a negative search ...


1

This document is not a granted patent. It is the publication of a patent application. If it is issued as a patent in the future the key will be the wording of the claims, not the abstract or other parts of the document.


1

Patents are primarily enforced on a country-by-country basis, although Europe has a new European Patent Court starting this year. The general rule (with exceptions below) is that an action only counts as infringement if it occurs within the borders of the country. Patent attorneys understand this issue and have a few tricks, such as drafting patents that ...


1

If you want to protect your idea you would get a solid US patent application on file before you publish anything about it. You might want to delve more into the practicality of the idea before publishing anything. One approach would be to file first on what you already have in mind and then do more thinking/work on possible implementations and file again on ...


1

I work for a company that might be able to help. Here is a way to identify patent attorneys active in specific technological areas and geographical regions: http://www.patent-pilot.com/en


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