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I am not familiar with this technology, but in my opinion your summaries about the two US patents are not accurate, or are so simple that obviously one would conclude that the patents could not have been granted. Patents are granted when the claims are directed to a technical product or process (not a concept as you put it, concepts cannot be patented) that ...


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I worked for the patent office for a little while in a TC that does some software and non transitory medium patent applications. I would take a look at the MPEP (Manual of Patent Examining Procedure) on the USPTO website if you haven't already. I doubt they would overturn a granted patent or even review it except for very peculiar circumstances. If you are ...


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No The way some of or all claims can be invalidated outside of a patent infringement case in a real (Article 3) court is via an IPR before the USPTO. The grounds in an IPR are limited to the issues of novelty and obviousness as shown by written published documents. Even in litigation the standards for inequitable conduct were raised considerably a few ...


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No and none. And mailing something to yourself was never worth anything. Under the previous U.S. patent law (anything filed before that portion of the AIA took effect in March 16, 2013), one could win a dispute with someone who filed earlier than you filed by showing you conceived of the invention before the other person and diligently went about reducing ...


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There are a couple of things to understand here: A patent is kind of an exchange between the public and the inventor. The basic legal theory is the inventor agrees to share their very special knowledge with the public (as soon as possible) in exchange for a the public granting a limited 20-year exclusive right to use, market, and sell products and services ...


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