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I am not your attorney. The following educational information might not be appropriate for your situation. You might want to consult your own attorney. The US constitution gives the intellectual property ownership rights of patents to their inventors. Inventors often assign those rights to a corporation but do not need to. Any owner of an interest in a ...


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The local employment laws and any agreements you have with the company will govern the ownership issues. I do not have any knowledge in that realm. However, if there is no agreement or action of law automatically assigning the invention to the company, you - as an inventor would have an undivided ownership of the patent under U.S. law. For the question of ...


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The strategies for what to claim and what embodiments to detail in a patent application might fall into the domain of your patent attorney (or patent agent). In terms of the hierarchy of sub-components of a product, inventorship might exist or not exit at all levels of the project. In some cases a critical sub-component is what enables the final product to ...


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I an an inventor, not a lawyer, so this is my best understanding. The specific criteria is whether you identify at least one claim which wouldn't have been there without your contribution. Ideally you can prove this by referencing your lab documentation or other permanent record. You really need to do something inventive. Preparing documents or even ...


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Your basic assumptions is flat wrong in any realistic case. Yes, in the case of joint inventors they have separate ability to practice and license the invention with no need to coordinate or transfer money between them. Not a practical commercial situation, but that is the law. However, the joint inventorship rules can be overcome by a contract between the ...


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Inventorship isn't like authorship where all significant contributors are listed. To be considered an inventor you need to provide a conceptual contribution to at least one claim. So the question is looking at each claim did any of the old members contribute the the concept contained in that claim. If so, the person should be added as an inventor on the ...


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NO That is not proper at all. In the U.S.someone who is not a true inventor needed to sign the paperwork declaring that they were a true inventor for the filing. The form says fraudulent signing is punishable by fine or imprisonment. One approach would be try to get them to assign the patent to your company along with a change in inventor to the actual ...


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I can't determine whether or not you should be listed as an inventor based on your description of your activities. The criteria for inventorship is not at all based on how much effort and time you put into the project. The criteria is based on whether you were responsible for the inventive element that is captured in a claim. To give an example, let's assume ...


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