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My guess is that depending on the jurisdiction, yes you can patent an algorithm to predict sports outcomes. Whether you should is a different question. Eighteen months after you file an application it will publish which means everyone can see your algorithm. I'm assuming most people would use it for themselves such that it would be very difficult to prove ...


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It doesn't matter. The US patent system is based on "first to invent", so it doesn't matter if other inventors find new ways to discover an identical solution later. It is still infringing on the original patent. If you think about it, computers (and AI) are no more or less a tool of invention than a pencil and draft board. There is nothing in intellectual ...


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Do the weights of a neural network get any kind of IP protection? Almost certainly not, as they are obvious (in a patent sense). The reasoning for this is a little bit indirect. Neural networks in general are very well-known and commonplace. In addition, training methods for neural networks are very well-known. By applying a known training method to a ...


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This may or may not apply. http://www.esaim-ps.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8211879 ESAIM: Probability and Statistics / Volume 13 / July 2009, pp 328-342


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An example of a common situation where people want to use streams of words and analyze their frequencies and how those frequencies change over time is the analysis of search terms that people use to find a website (i.e. If I went to Google or Bing and searched for "patent discussion" and then clicked on the result, the site I went to would want to know those ...


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Would Wordle be in the right direction as prior art, or is this not specific enough? http://www.wordle.net/ There are examples on the Wordle website which are 5+ years old. I also found a blog from 2009 which contextually appears the same as "Detecting trends from a stream of words based on frequency analysis of word counts". The blog author states: I ...


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I'm going to add the beginning of another possible set of sources here, but I'd like to know if people think they sound right. The way the the described process basically looks for mix-and-match meaning that web pages have regions, a lot of the regions may be identical, but other regions are different, and then also that they may be somewhat rearranged on ...


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From Elin's comment of 1/14/2014: Information retrieval system and method that generates weighted comparison results to analyze the degree of dissimilarity between a reference corpus and a candidate document US 6167398 A ABSTRACT An internet information agent accepts a reference document, performs an analysis upon it in accordance with metrics defined ...


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This sounds the same as Netscape Navigator's "What's Related" feature. This may overlap with their "What's Cool" functionality too. Both of which were present in their Navigator product circa ~1995. Their may be others, but this is at least one patent tied to those features: "Shared document repository with coupled recommender system" US 6999962 B2 ...


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A Vector Space Model for Automatic Indexing (1975) by G. Salton, A. Wong, and C. S. Yang. The first two paragraphs (after the abstract) describe how to compute a similarity coefficient between two documents. The documents are associated with one or more index terms; a weight for each term may be computed according to its importance in the given document; ...


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