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In the past I got several good searches with KPO as ISA. From the U.S. the cost is still about 1/2 what it would be from the EPO. When I started using Korea they were new and charged even less. It is not part of the body of the question but you could hire a search firm.


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There is no particular office I would say. Some patent offices have examiners more knowledgeable in some topics than others, then some examiners are better than others. You could file the same application twice with the same patent office and get two completely different search reports. Since no patent office guarantees a perfect search report, some ...


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I am not a lawyer so this might not be right, but it is my best guess. In Case A, I'm assuming the meeting was internal to the two companies and no-one in the meeting then publicly disclosed the invention. In this case there is no public disclosure. Company A is trusting Company B to keep the invention private. This actually happens pretty frequently and ...


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It is not a clear science but fortunately an examiner can't just say "seems obvious to me" In the U.S., first the examiner must find a base reference with an embodiment that has some of the elements of your claim, but not all. It must also be in the same field or could be "analogous art" from a different field where the same problem is ...


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In Europe the problem-and-solution approach is used most of the times because it is said to be an objective assessment of inventive step/non-obviousness. Below I reproduce some points about it. The same methodology is used in some other countries, most notably China and Japan. In the problem-solution approach, there are three main stages: (i) determining ...


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As we used to say "Do you walk to school or do you carry your lunch?" The question is a non-sequitur. Being granted a patent has absolutely nothing to do with your freedom to operate. Your patent affects others' freedom to operate. Your patent confers no positive rights for you to do anything. The only way your patent application process impacts ...


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No. First - you can't patent the same structure under a different theory of why you are doing it. Some claims (device, machine, system, apparatus, etc.) are to a thing. Your "new" thing is exactly the same, structurally as an old thing so this is 100% out. In the other example, if your antibodies are different antibodies then you have a different ...


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