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When Google patents says "also published as" it is not being precise and that is a primary cause for the confusion. As you are aware, each country has its own system of patent numbering. More fundamentally, the have their own entire patent systems. A Canadian patent number is not just a different name given to a U.S. patent. They may have the same ...


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Your best bet is The Lens. The Lens does patent searching like Google Patents, but is much more feature packed. One of the options in Summary View is to sort by "Cited" which list the most cited patents in the current search in order. In addition, there is a really nifty graphical analysis view which shows lots of other interesting information. The Lens is ...


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How do I confirm if an United States patent has been filed through the PCT A US patent that started as a PCT application and then entered the US system can be detected by looking on the front page for item (21) Appl. No. If the originating application was a PCT application you will see PCT in the application number. Is there [something] on a granted ...


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• If an US patent has been filed through the PCT, it can be confirmed from the bibliographic details / front page of the US patent which includes the fields like PCT filed, PCT No., 371 Date, 102(e) Date, PCT Pub. No., and/or PCT Pub. Date. • No, such details are not available on the US granted patent. It can be viewed on WIPO IP portal @ https://...


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You need to use the same number for the same part in all drawings that show and number that part. Furthermore, the parts should be named. All springs, for example, would not have the same number. Different springs probably have different characteristics and roles so they would get different numbers. In addressing each figure you might say, "FIG. 2 shows an ...


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These are kind codes. They are effectively version numbers for published versions of the patent application. Every country has their own set of kind codes, but typically an A code (such as A1) represents a patent application, and a B code (such as B2) represents a granted patent. The background behind this system is provided in WIPO's standard ST.16. WIPO ...


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I am not sure what you mean by "inactive". This patent expired in 2011 due to nonpayment of the 7 1/2 year maintenance fee. It is conceivable that the owner could petition to revive it on the basis that the nonpayment was unavoidable or inadvertent. After 2 years that might not fly. In any case, a third party (you) cannot come along and get rights to it by "...


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