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Do not put this person's name on the patent as an inventor! And please do not treat their advice as gospel. First, they are breaking the rules by providing advice to you about your filing. It is practicing law without a license. Next, the examiner is correct that all inventors need to qualify as micro entity applicants. From the form GROSS INCOME LIMIT ...


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No and none. And mailing something to yourself was never worth anything. Under the previous U.S. patent law (anything filed before that portion of the AIA took effect in March 16, 2013), one could win a dispute with someone who filed earlier than you filed by showing you conceived of the invention before the other person and diligently went about reducing ...


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There are a couple of things to understand here: A patent is kind of an exchange between the public and the inventor. The basic legal theory is the inventor agrees to share their very special knowledge with the public (as soon as possible) in exchange for a the public granting a limited 20-year exclusive right to use, market, and sell products and services ...


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The first thing to do is understand what the terms mean. It is okay to call yourself a "co-inventor" on a patent application, just be sure you call a patent application an "application". You also need to understand that a patent application does not mean a patent will ever issue. It can take a few successful patents before you understand if you're likely to ...


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