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23

I don't think there is a direct answer available. Your circumstances actually pose a generic strategy question for someone with an idea for something new. As I have written in answer to other questions, the underlying issue is net present value of the idea/invention. How do you capture, and then accelerate, that value? You are confronted with compound ...


9

I have a few suggestions: the USPTO is helping local non-profits set up pro bono patent help. (pro-se and pro bono at USPTO) The first one up and running is in Minneapolis but others are getting on line. Second there may be an inventors club in your area and there may be members who are patent agents or patent attorneys who can provide some advice on DIY ...


3

Unfortunately, the patent system has evolved to the point where it is unlikely for there to be a "win/win" situation for the independent inventor/small business and a "patent professional." Transactional costs for patent attorneys can be staggering, arising from ever-increasing insurance premiums, employment costs, on-line services fees, and the hidden cost ...


3

An alternative not yet mentioned is to consult with your university's tech transfer office. You should do so under confidentiality agreement or otherwise ensure that they will keep any disclosure confidential so it does not count as prior art against you. Many professors are in the same situation as you-they have a potentially patentable invention but no ...


2

As a solo practitioner, I'd like to explain the advantages of going the other way. Yes you will pay more to work with a big firm, but there can be added-value that makes it worth it. The software consultant working through a large organization may not get specific support from that large organization that provides a benefit to you, the client. In the case ...


2

An inventor wants someone to work with where the fees are reasonable and never a surprise. It is also important to find someone you can communicate well with and who has the expertise, time and will to actually understand the core of your invention. Both inventor and applicant need to view a patent is a business tool and not an end unto itself. Of corse a ...


1

In my country we can ask for a senior patent examiner to review the matter. I have previously used that as a technique to have the examiner have a realistic viewpoint. Also we have an appeals process whereby we can appeal a decision of the Commissioner. If I was you I would hire a patent attorney (or whatever they are called in your country) and have the ...


1

There is no such thing an an unregistered patent agent. Being registered is what makes you a patent agent. Registered patent agents can represent one before the USPTO and provide legal advice that is narrowly related to that representation. That means a patent agent can give a patentability opinion, for example. Patent agents can write patent applications, ...


1

To the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO, as I'm sure you know it) in the context of patents (that is, not for trademarks), a registered patent agent is pretty well the same as a patent attorney. They can both file the paperwork, and there aren't any patent skills implicit to someone who's gone to law school, let alone passed the bar, that a ...


1

Searching is a highly debated process, and a lot of patent professionals will argue that you shouldn't do a search, or that you have to. I know that's not your question, but it's an important piece of the answer. The short answers to your questions are: any company can provide a searching service, maybe, and yes. Ultimately, the entirety of the burden ...


1

It sounds like the places you are responding to online are invention submission companies. Both the USPTO and the Federal Trade Commission have information warning about the practices of many firms in that industry. You will also see inventors on-line who have got their own patent through the system and are now holding themselves out as qualified to help ...


1

The USPTO maintains a list of attorneys and agents with licenses to practice before the US Patent and Trademark Office. Currently, there are 10741 active agents and 31669 active attorneys. All searches reflect current information. Information concerning a practitioner's status as an attorney is based on records provided to the Office of Enrollment and ...


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