4

INID code Internationally agreed Numbers for the Identification of bibliographic data in patent. 12 stand for kind of document, 10 stands for Identification of the patent, SPC or patent document. These number are standard in all participating countries, irrespective of language published you can identify the patent number using the code. see in the below ...


4

The standard approach is to execute a non-disclosure agreement with the potential consultant(s). I have many times requested quotations from consultants on projects containing proprietary technology and have never had an issue with the ideas being stolen. Assuming the non-disclosure agreement was executed (perhaps as part of the request for quotation) the ...


3

Yes to the body of the question, No to the title of the question You can imagine a dependent claim as being re-written as concatenated at the end of the independent claim. If there is "an X" in the independent claim the dependent claim should use "the X". If the dependent claim has "an X", it could be ambiguously seen as introducing a second X. Since claim ...


3

Besides copying and pasting, they work in modest sized art units and often further specialize within an art unit. If you see laser printer power supplies all day every day you probably get pretty good at that area of technology. Also, they do not cite case law widely. If it isn't in the MPEP or some written USPTO guidelines, they do not cite it.


3

For patent do you have to make your discovery public? The answer to your headline question is yes. The central societal trade off in the patent system is you teach us all about your invention and we (the government) give you a possibility of a time limited monopoly. But, the body of your question is not actually that question. The U.S., like most of the ...


3

Where an invention is created has no impact at all on the ability to be patented in the US. Nor does the nationality of the inventor or company. Under the Paris Convention, all (177) member countries must give people and companies from all other member countries the same substantial patent rights as they give their own nationals. ARTICLE 2, paragraph (l)...


3

Continuous application receive the priority date from first filed application but not the allowance date. To receive the priority from first application you need to file continuous application before a patent gets granted, if you wish to file after the patent has granted then you would loose the opportunity. In the question you have asked if a patent was ...


3

The epo doesn't use the name continuation and the concepts are somewhat different. What you can do however: You can file a new application claiming priority within one year of the first filing and introduce new subject matter there. The new matter will have the new priority date and the old matter will have the old priority date. You can also file a ...


2

They provide a way to cover many combinations and permutations of elements in a relatively few numbered claims. The semantics are no different than exploding the claims to a huge number of non-multiply dependent claims. The U.S. thinks they are confusing and strongly discourages them via is fee system. The rest of the world sees them as using fewer words to ...


2

As no proof of concept is required, it doesn't matter how you got one. Or if.


2

Under the AIA there is a provision to file an, essentially, no-content continuation. Use the File by Reference option on the ADS form. You need to follow up with specification, drawings and claims later but you will have filed the continuation on time if it is before the parent issues as a patent. See https://www.uspto.gov/patent/forms/important-information-...


2

If you are overwhelmed by the vast number of patents, there is not much of a cure. On the other hand if you have a specific invention you have made and want to find out if it is patentable, you can do a patentablity search - another answer from Eric Shain outlines how you could go about it. I have experienced a phenomena of dead-on prior art existing but not ...


2

The only "micro form" I know of with the USPTO is the form/checkbox to claim micro-entity status to get reduced fees. I assume you are talking about the filing of an application. Once you file an application, either provisional or non-provisional, you can disclose your invention and not break novelty. For the U.S. you have a quasi grace period of a year so ...


2

The U.S. application should have all of those elements but the U.S. application is not an EPO application. The content can be the same or different but a counterpart EPO application will be a new application filed with the EPO that claims priority to the U.S. application under the Paris Convention. This only works if the utility application is the first ...


1

No and Yes It is not an indication that it is approved but it is an indication that the application is about to be published for the public to see. Note that a few actions below you see that a non-final rejection was mailed. There are a few steps after a rejection before you get a patent. The information you posted is from one of the tabs in Public PAIR ...


1

My question is related to this news, How can a patent be applied by someone who did not invent it in the first place? I agree @Eric Shain had answered most of your question. I would like to add the background of the case. As China is suffering from an epidemic out break of Coronavirus (2019-nCov) the doctors are struggling to determine what is the best ...


1

One can apply for a patent on a new use for an existing drug. You still might need a license to produce the drug so the original patent owner may well encourage such activity.


1

And the direct answer to your question is yes, if you have some reason to file two provisionals. Lets say you file one and then decide you have another aspect of the system that you think is patentable. Feel free to copy whatever is relevant from the first one you filed. And, there is no such thing as a provisional patent, only a provisional patent ...


1

Hi I called the inventor's assistance center regarding my question above, and they suggested that I file one provisional and then when filing the non-provisional do two separate claims.


1

The lifetime of design patent is 14 years (for designs which were filed before May 13, 2015) / 15 years (for designs which were filed on or after May 13, 2015) from the date of grant. It doesn’t have any maintenance fee during their lifetime and expires once the design rights term completed. unfortunately, design patents cannot be renewed. Once a design ...


1

The short answer is you perform a patent search. You are absolutely correct to suggest this is a substantial undertaking. I am not a professional patent searcher, but I've done my fair share. You can certainly start with Google Patents, but I've found The Lens to have some useful additional features. My process is generally to try different search terms to ...


1

After two rejections, you most likely did need to file an RCE (Request for Continued Examination)to keep the examination of the application proceeding. If you filed an RCE the bureaucracy dockets this to the examiner as a "new case" even though it isn't actually a new case.


1

In my country we can ask for a senior patent examiner to review the matter. I have previously used that as a technique to have the examiner have a realistic viewpoint. Also we have an appeals process whereby we can appeal a decision of the Commissioner. If I was you I would hire a patent attorney (or whatever they are called in your country) and have the ...


1

There is no such thing an an unregistered patent agent. Being registered is what makes you a patent agent. Registered patent agents can represent one before the USPTO and provide legal advice that is narrowly related to that representation. That means a patent agent can give a patentability opinion, for example. Patent agents can write patent applications, ...


1

EFS-Web is not very user friendly. You probably already looked at the USPTO's guide to EFS-Web. I don't think the EBC Help Desk people - who are very patient and helpful, will be much help with actual decisions, more the mechanics of uploading. The PDF files need to be 8.5" by 11" (or A4) and have names that are EFS-Web legal. If a PDF is somehow 8.25" by ...


1

You are presumably talking about claims that preempt all uses of a law of nature. A law of nature is not patentable. A claim that preempted all possible uses of a law of nature is essentially an attempt to patent that law of nature.


1

It is not advisable to contact the examiner - From the MPEP - 1134 Third Party Inquiries and Correspondence in a Published Application The Office considers inappropriate any third-party inquiry, or submission in an application that is not provided for in 37 CFR 1.290 or 37 CFR 1.291. Any submission filed by a third party in an application that does not ...


1

The expression 'based on' looks vague and ambiguous to me. Its breadth, no matter what the cause, risks coming at a cost. If I were procuring a patent I would prefer to avoid the expression and use clearer and more definite language. One does not have to lose generic character in the search for definiteness. If I were confronted with a third-party patent ...


1

The old impetus for documenting your progress was for two reasons a) to prove a date of conception to use as evidence in an interference proceeding where you and another inventor were going through examination at about the same time and b) to “swear behind” a prior art reference in the case where a reference is cited against you. It was possible to make the ...


1

You don't introduce it again, unless you want to clutter your description with annoying repetitions. There are two main ways of doing this “right“ (and of course a bunch of variations). You can describe your invention as one example and describe the alternatives only per element. For example: a vehicle with a motor 1 and a windshield 2. In one ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible