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The USPTO imposes an additional fee beyond the provisional filing fee for each 50 sheets beyond 100 sheets (pages) for a provisional patent application. That fee ranges from $100 for a micro entity, $200 for a small entity and $400 for a large entity. The limit is based on the number of total sheets(pages) in the application, including the drawings and ...


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Can I use Microsoft Paint for drawings? Yes. There is no legal restriction on what software you use to produce the drawings initially. As long as the final product complies with the requirements of 37 CFR 1.84 (which basically requires clear line drawings), you should be fine. Moreover, there is no requirement for vector drawings. While these are ...


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Having a figure that is too large for one sheet (especially with the minimum font sizes and required margins) is fairly common for electronic circuits, sample computer code to implement a function, or detailed flow charts. There used to be hard copies of drawing guidelines with samples that folks used as a reference for questions like this. That material ...


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Yes you can use MS Paint, but it isn't a good choice. Paint is a painting program which means it edits pixels. Thus its output when printed tends to look blocky and low quality. Much better is a vector drawing application. These print out at high resolution and allow scaling without degradation. If you have access to Microsoft Office, then you will find ...


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So I will present one approach. But I should caution that this is not the approach, and others may quite reasonably differ. If an inventive step solves several problems outlined in the background, should you list each problem as an "object of the invention" separately and if so, do you need to address each solution separately when writing the detailed ...


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Of course you may use Powerpoint, but there are some decent reasons not to. First and foremost, Powerpoint simply isn't that good for drawing graphics (in my humble opinion), especially if you are doing diagrams like flowcharts. Visio is designed for this sort of thing as is the open source Dia. With diagramming software, the lines that link blocks stay ...


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The MPEP says reference characters are preferably numerical. Patent applications do not usually have "chapters" and there is no need to invent a convention like that. As mentioned, even numbers let you add a number later without worrying about re-numbering but renumbering would not be needed anyway. That is not true of drawings - they need to be in order. ...


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Yes, many figures can be on one sheet. There is no need to use multiple sheets but if you have more than one figure per sheet you need to be careful that everything is correctly drawn under the USPTO rules to be seen as individual figures. If you look at older patents you will see many figures per sheet. However, making the figures small might hurt clarity ...


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It's fine to not have surface shading, as long as your drawings are clear without it. That is, surface shading is just one technique that is used to completely and adequately show the nature of the design you are claiming. MPEP § 1503.02(II) specifically addresses this exactly question. While surface shading is not required under 37 CFR 1.152, it may be ...


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The purpose of drawings is to help explain the invention, including ensuring it is enabled. Consequently, you should include any drawings that would be useful for the reader to this end. If no drawings would be useful, then there is no obligation to include any. If the invention subsists in how the known elements are connected together, then this could well ...


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I'm not a patent lawyer and don't have much experience with provisional patent applications, but I do have quite a few patents some of which are software related. I'm going to try to answer your questions, but don't consider this legal advice. What should I include in the drawings? You should include whatever is necessary to describe your invention. This ...


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There is no restriction/permission by the patent office for the use of any software. However, there are some guidelines related to formatting of drawings that need to be follow, for eg. page margin, page size, sheet number etc. You can use any software to make drawings as long as the guidelines are complied and drawings are clear to understand.


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No. There is no legal reason not to use Power Point.


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For reasons no one can explain, Google provides two different sites for viewing patents www.google.com/patents and patents.google.com. Only patents.google.com reliably shows patent figures. I would suggest, however, that you seriously consider using The Lens for patent searching. Here is US9476133 on The Lens. You'll find the entire PDF with figures. The ...


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Most patent illustrations are line drawings. As such, they are best created with a vector drawing program. Vector drawing programs edit graphic primitives such as lines and curves rather than pixels. For this reason, they can be easily rescaled and will always render and print out at high resolution. Commercial examples are Adobe Illustrator and Corel Draw. ...


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Dependent claims are narrowing in that they incorporate the limitations of the independent claim. I haven’t filed for patent protection for some time now, but the objects are for clear disclosure and not really necessary provided that the specification as a whole has adequate disclosure of the invention and to support the claims.


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I'm assuming you're drawing it digitally and not by hand, personally if by hand I would use small down arrows to say it's a lower level X. Digitally, maybe something along the lines of X_, X-, or X~?


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I used MS Paint for my first provisional patent application. One hint is to also get Paint.Net. MS Paint can add a 'fog' of pixels around parts every time you make a change or copy. Running the drawing through Noise reduction a few times in Paint.Net will get rid of this. Paint.Net will also resize images much better. For my second PPA I used SketchUp, ...


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