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In your example, you cannot claim priority from the PCT in your US non-provisional because the PCT does not predate the US non-provisional. The only way you would be able to claim priority from the PCT is by filing a subsequent US non-provisional within the applicable priority year. Accordingly, if the subject-matter of all the claims of the PCT was ...


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The U.S., the EPO and other locations offer provisional rights related to the publication of patent applications. The rights vary, but the idea is that you can potentially recover royalties from others who make, sell, use, etc. in a way that infringe the claims you eventually get in an issued patent, the royalties essentially back-dated to the time of your ...


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This may be useful to have your answer.1 The easiest way out, in the light of 35 USC Section 271(a), is holding importer responsible for infringement. 2


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This is a U.S. patent and. like all U.S. patents, is only enforceable in the U.S. It allows the owner to try to stop others from making, selling, offering for sale, importing and using. There has been some cross border enforcement for components of patented items and uses at sea but the bottom line is that patents are fundamentally territorial.


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It looks like a pretty normal design patent. design patents are a lot simpler than what people would normally consider a patent to be. They claim the design itself, so what the bottle looks like. If you want more info on design patents check this out: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_patent Source: Former patent examiner Edit: My bad, I did a very ...


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It's possible that he is the legal inventor, depending on the nature of the "problems" which you encountered. It is also possible that he isn't, and that you're the legal inventor. The issue is going to be whether or not his "requirements" met the legal definition for an invention and didn't require any additional inventive steps. If the solution to these ...


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