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You may be able to patent a new use for an old thing, but you can't patent the thing itself unless it's somehow different from the old thing. What you may be able to do is patent the new method of use. For your example, you might be successful in claiming: A method of preventing a door from closing, comprising: inserting a shoe horn between a bottom of ...


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That number is the publication number of a U.S. patent application. It is not a granted patent at this time. Looking in the USPTO database Public PAIR, I see that it got a "final rejection" recently. That doesn't mean final; just final until more money is paid to a Request for Continued Publication. From the same database, the PCT application (WO2016179586) ...


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Games are patentable subject matter in the U.S. and have been covered by both apparatus claims and method claims. There are many many patents on "proprietary" card games involving betting that are variations on poker, etc. There are patents on method of playing certain board games. The fact that chess, as is normally played, is old does not mean one can't ...


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Each claim is taken on its own. If your product meets everything laid out in any single claim then your product infringes that claim, and therefore infringes the patent. You may have have heard that you need to have all elements of a claim to infringe - that is correct, all elements of any claim, not all claims. You and your product may or may not attract ...


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You are presumably talking about claims that preempt all uses of a law of nature. A law of nature is not patentable. A claim that preempted all possible uses of a law of nature is essentially an attempt to patent that law of nature.


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In addition to George White answer I would like to add that, if you are trying to reproduce the product in US and then export to other countries then also you would be liable as an infringer if the patent gets granted .


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The expression 'based on' looks vague and ambiguous to me. Its breadth, no matter what the cause, risks coming at a cost. If I were procuring a patent I would prefer to avoid the expression and use clearer and more definite language. One does not have to lose generic character in the search for definiteness. If I were confronted with a third-party patent ...


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I think the answer is that it depends on the context. I have included three examples from three different patents. The first uses depending upon while the second uses based upon. I do not think the meaning would be changed if they were reversed. The third uses using. In the context, the other two terms would not make sense if placed into this claim. This is ...


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The scope often differs from patent to patent, i would try to explain the difference using following example. In simple term the term Based on protects the underlying principle i.e., alternates that uses the same principle can be covered by this phrase. Eg 1; A patent claims an oil-based substance the claim scope can cover a lotion or a greasy or oily ...


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Freedom-to-operate opinions are always complex so you will absolutely need to consult with a real live patent attorney or agent to get an informed opinion. That said, given your hypothetical, you very well may be able to get a patent for the application of the patented device as a "door stop". This assumes there are no other patents with similar devices ...


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There are no drawings "missing" from this patent document at google patents. Only in the case of U.S. patent documents are drawings and a PDF of the original document provided at all. They aren't missing, they just aren't directly shown at google patents for any non-U.S. patent document. For non-U.S. documents google provides a link to a location that has ...


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Any patent from that time from would have long long ago expired and the time to sue anyone for infringement during the time it was in force is also long gone. A patent can be sold outright by the inventor to a company or they could agree on a royalty of some sort. That is all between the inventor and the licensee or assignee.


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Optimal protection for your idea would be to file both a utility and design patent.The utility patent protects the functional aspect of your invention- getting a better grip when a person picks up big circular stones (think wrapping duct tape around fore arms). It also provides broader patent protection against patent infringement should a competitor try to ...


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