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From the USPTO web site: To the Full-Text of a Particular Patent: A special shortened URL format: http://patft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?patentnumber=5123456 where the patent number "5123456" may be replaced by any valid patent number within the database, has been established to enable users to more easily construct a URL for bookmarking or ...


6

A patent search is most often the first step in achieving different objectives, some of which are: Determining the probability of having a patent granted to a proposed invention Determining if you have the freedom to operate Determining if a granted patent can be invalidated Based on the objective, the search strategy can vary to some extent. Also, in ...


5

As far as I know, Google updates their database every other month and the data they input in their database are a couple of months late. It is still best that you search for patents in the USPTO or in other patent databases that are more regularly updated than Google patents.


3

How good is your Japanese? This method only works using the Japanese portal for J-PlatPat. The English one omits the key link. Search for the patent using J-PlatPat. The three important fields are 特許出願番号 (for patent application numbers), 公開・公表特許公報(A) (for publication numbers) and 特許公報・公告特許広報(B) (for patent numbers). Click on the publication or ...


3

The lens has a search machine for sequences plus some analytics tools at lens.org/lens/bio


3

Creating a URL to the USPTO's published applications is ugly. But, if you have a number of publications, one work-around is to create the links in the format required by the USPTO by using Excel functions and macros. A list of publication numbers can be placed in a first column, while portions of the constant 'boilerplate' text is placed in a second column,...


3

Issued US Patents Assigned to Oracle (and top 14 subsidiaries): Assignee Estimated Issued US Patents 1. Sun Microsystems 7,467 2. Oracle 4,207 3. Storage Technologies Corp 740 4. BEA Systems ...


2

How complete a list are you looking for? It isn't too hard to search patent databases by assignee. It is also not too hard to get the names of major subsidiaries. However the assgnee in the database is the orignial assignee only. A patent may have been bought and sold ten times but on its face still has the original assignee as of the day the issue fee was ...


2

Here's how to get a direct link to a PDF document given a patent number. The patent number is split into three sections: Group A, digits 0-2 (using an 8 digit number, often digit 0 will be a 0 for <10m patent numbers) Group B, digits 3-5 Group C, digits 6-7 So patent 9876543 will be grouped as A(098) B(765) C(43). The URL is the following, with (A), (...


2

Search for assignment of patents and patent applications in the USPTO assignments database. The first assignor is usually the inventor (a human being), and the first assignee is whoever owns the patent (usually a corporation). Searching for an Assignee Name of IAC yielded dozens of hits, mostly for IAC SEARCH & MEDIA, INC. based in Oakland Ca, and one ...


2

There are vast method to cover all patents filed by inventor, It depends on indexing of database, truncation or errors made while filing or indexing, language etc. A person has to design various keywords to cover all possibilities. Still researcher may not get complete information if patent office is not included in searchable database. To search inventor ...


2

Starting point for you is to see all the brochures, investor reports, annual reports and website of said company for relevant patent numbers. if you find them its good if not then you switch to patent search websites. You have to check both utility patents and design patents if related integrated circuits too. the way to search will be searching by ...


2

If you would like to do a patent search, there are several free sites available. This answer describes my approach to searching and has links to some sites so you should read that first. Also, you should review this answer which will educate you on the patent system: Is this patent valid? Granted? Which countries does it cover? Are there family members?. ...


2

The search tool I always used was www.freepatentsonline.com. I'll go through the searches I tried. Searching for "bale" When I search all documents dated between 1840 and 1895, I only find 5 that mention baling, bale, or baler. All 5 documents name Peter Dederick of Loudonville, New York. Here is a sample of these docs. Searching for "John E. French" ...


2

There is not a hard requirement to include page numbers and current paranoid practice says to not include page numbers. It it turns out that something on a page that was not enumerated has something very relevant you can be accused of intentionally misleading the examiner.


1

While the USPTO allows searching old patents only by patent number and classification, espacenet allows searches by inventors and/or keywords (title). I tried finding the patent in question searching for "French" as inventor between 01/01/1800 and 01/01/1900 and skimmed through the list, but couldn't find it. If you want to look more thoroughly, here's the ...


1

For reasons no one can explain, Google provides two different sites for viewing patents www.google.com/patents and patents.google.com. Only patents.google.com reliably shows patent figures. I would suggest, however, that you seriously consider using The Lens for patent searching. Here is US9476133 on The Lens. You'll find the entire PDF with figures. The ...


1

This is the kind of thing that commercial IP databases do well. The assignment information is available from the various national patent offices. The commercial concerns cross reference all of the assignments with data from state/national corporate registration databases to ensure that these are all found. The process is, I expect, rather intensive and so ...


1

According to the CPC classification, which is used by the EPO and USPTO, you may find groups of classification that fits into lifesciences, namely the group C (Chemestry). There is no specific classification for lifesciences. Thus you have to filter what groups apply. Then you may use Esp@cenet, the biggest world repository of patent publications, and then ...


1

I think any of the usual patent search sites may be able to help with this. I particularly like The Lens, but patents.google.com or www.freepatentsonline.com/search.html would do as well. The secret is to use classification codes to define the field of search. Here are links for US and international codes. Classification codes are complex and generally more ...


1

It would depend on the agreement you signed with the attorney (and drafted by the attorney, of course!). Personally, I don't think the attorney should be liable if it's found your company hasn't invented anything. A perfect patent search is impossible. There're over 9 million granted U.S. patents, so you need to narrow your search scope, typically by 1) ...


1

The link in your question is the granted patent. You can see on the box at the right of the Google Patents page that its Publication Type is "Grant," meaning it's a patent and no longer an application, and that its Publication date was July 15, 2014. Unfortunately, I can't speak to the licensing that its assignee has in place, if any, and I don't know ...


1

Please use Truncation for classification as you are not using complete classification. e.g. icl/c07$ AND icl/a61$


1

There are a lot of misconceptions about search, so let me explain it a bit. As a practitioner in the field since 1999, having a master degree in this specific area and actually building commercial search engines for a living, I think I know what I'm talking about. I'll tell a bit about search and a bit on patent search in particular. The main reason I write ...


1

Can I patent the same idea with my own methodology? You can obtain a patent incorporating the same idea as long as your own methodology is a non-obvious improvement over the prior art (including but not limited to that specific competitor's patent). The claims will have to include some of the methodology details to render them non-obvious. Is it illegal ...


1

Depending on the technology area, Google Scholar is about the best you can do for free. You'll end up getting hits on papers that are not free, but a lot of the scholarly papers are available for free. Google Scholar also searches patents at the same time, so its use is both time and cost effective.


1

It will only show your patents. You can't use it to access unpublished applications filed by others.


1

Comprehensiveness in coverage. Ability to include English machine translations of non-English specifications and claims in a search (not just abstract). Search results ranked by relevance. Easy hyperlinks to forward and backward citations. Automatically store a large number of search query histories. Proximity criteria in searching. Folders for saved ...


1

Definitely, the user interface wherein one can easily access the claims, summary and drawings related to the patents get the highest priority. Also, the engines which give clear and easy access to classifications of the patent i.e. the US classification, the ECLA and the CPC classification are preferred. Thirdly, a search engine which accesses patents ...


1

Try http://google.com/patents (and use Google-fu) - as George White commented however, that patent might have been brought and sold several times at your time of search


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