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A patent application needs whatever drawings are require to explain the invention to one of ordinary skill in the art and to prove that you "possessed the invention" at the time of filing. Most people will advise more detail rather than less, unless the detail obscures the understanding. If the circuit itself is the tricky part of the invention you ...


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value is in the eye of the buyer, no one can give an answer which is either yes it is worth patent or no it is not worth patent. worth is not only dependent on the idea alone, it also depends on what you do with the idea (patent it and make a business out of it, license it or wait for someone to approach you with funding), how the market receives your idea ...


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It is actually a very hard question. It is also probably off topic as it is really a business question rather than a patent question. Regardless, I'll give you a few thoughts. First, your machine may or may not be patentable. Just because you don't see it in the market doesn't mean someone hasn't already patented it. It might not even be considered ...


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I think you are mistaken about basic premise of patent application prosecution timeline. Australia, like any other PCT member countries or Paris Convention member countries, adheres to one year time counting from the date an application was first presented to patent office of any member country (also known as priority date) and not to date of publication of ...


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As Eric mentioned in a comment, the issue is degree of disclosure. It can be a subtle issue. A publication that explained a result but did not show how to achieve the result would not be novelty breaking. If you think that might be your situation you can file an application and provide the USPTO with all of the information about the publication. Dates, ...


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