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As you describe it, the method would be a narrowing of the existing method but, due to added mechanism, would have broader use than the previous method. It is not really a generalization of the old method. There are similar cases where patents are awarded for someone finding a sweet spot in an already known method. Maybe at a certain temperature range a ...


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To be patentable an invention needs to be useful, novel and non-obvious. It might be hard to convince a patent examiner of novelty and non-obviousness if you just tweak an existing device. Even if you do manage to get a patent on an invention that builds on prior art by adding steps, your patent would only be on the system including the added steps not on ...


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I'm not an expert in this nor a lawyer. My understanding is you can't patent an abstract mathematical algorithm in its own right. What you might be able to patent is the application of an algorithm to solving a specific problem. This is a bit of a moving target as there have been some recent legal decisions with regards to software patents. With regards to ...


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Theorems are excluded from patentability. 35 U.S.C. 101 Inventions patentable. Whoever invents or discovers any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof, may obtain a patent therefor, subject to the conditions and requirements of this title. Emphasis added.


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