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Disclaimer: the following is just personal opinion. Always talk to your attorney for professional legal advices. You should read through all the claims and check if the specification & diagram substantiate the claims. If the specification and the claims only describe the preferred implementation but does not describe alternative approaches that are ...


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What you are asking about is patentability of software or algorithms. This is a tricky subject and there have been recent court decisions that have impacted this. I am not a lawyer but I do have a couple of algorithm patents. My best understanding is that in the US you can patent the application of a specific algorithm to a specific need. For instance, I ...


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I agree with George White. I have several algorithm based patents. In all cases, they patent the application of a novel algorithm to solving a very specific problem (analysis of real time PCR results). I've been told (I'm not a lawyer myself) that an algorithm, by itself, would be considered "abstract" and thus unpatentable. Even if you decide on a specific ...


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It is possible but it would need to be applied to some useful end. Using the terms algorithm and mathematical law in the text of a patent application would liking get it rejected out of hand unless phrased very carefully.


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Pre AIA MPEP (Manual of Patent Examining Procedure) states: https://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/mpep/s2133.html Likewise, there may be a nonpublic, e.g., “secret,” sale or offer to sell an invention which nevertheless constitutes a statutory bar. Hobbs v.United States, 451 F.2d 849, 859-60, 171 USPQ 713, 720 (5th Cir. 1971). In similar fashion, not all “...


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It's a complicated answer, but what's important to understand is that algorithms-related inventions, software-related inventions, and the like CAN indeed be patentable in the U.S. There are certainly many misconceptions and much mis-information on this because while the software itself or the mathmatical formula itself may not be patentable, an invention ...


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