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A U.S. answer. Some things in the field you describe are patentable in the U.S. and some are not. Unfortunately, above novelty and non-obviousness, the current huge hurdle is abstractness. The law on this in the U.S. has changed in the last few years in the direction of making it much easier to shoot down something as abstract. The broader range of processes ...


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My answer refers to European patent practice. Most probably you will not be able to get a patent granted for the method/algorithm if you do not refer it to a particular industrial application. Without claiming the different steps of the industrial procedure, the steps of your method/algorithm will be considered a mathematical method or a computer program as ...


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No and none. And mailing something to yourself was never worth anything. Under the previous U.S. patent law (anything filed before that portion of the AIA took effect in March 16, 2013), one could win a dispute with someone who filed earlier than you filed by showing you conceived of the invention before the other person and diligently went about reducing ...


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There are a couple of things to understand here: A patent is kind of an exchange between the public and the inventor. The basic legal theory is the inventor agrees to share their very special knowledge with the public (as soon as possible) in exchange for a the public granting a limited 20-year exclusive right to use, market, and sell products and services ...


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There are no "addendum" to a patent application. You have a couple of options. One is to file a provisional and later file a non-provisional that could be a CIP (Continuation in Part) to the current application, also getting priority from the non-provisional, or could just be a new non-provisional.


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