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Yes, if their application pre-dated your public disclosure. Another possibility is the person's product came after yours but the examiner does not find your device or anything else like it. A patent might be granted. In your defense, if sued for infringement, you would have your documentation that the information was public before the other person's filing ...


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Simply put, yes. A little more precisely, there may be existing patents that the product infringes. Either the product as a whole (a personal cooling unit) or parts of the product (like the straps or the cooling mechanism or the power supply) or the way you make the product (for example, a patent on some particular way of assembling the device). The ...


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The provisional patent shouldn't become a part of the public domain unless you publish it (at least for the USPTO, provisional applications are not published, and non-provisional applications are not published until ~18 months after the initial submission, which includes the provisional.) Provisional applications and pre-grant nonprovisionals only confer ...


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"Business Ideas" cannot be patented, only novel processes that are not deemed wholly abstract. Thus, if you had a design for a new type of engine, you could seek a patent. But if you had an idea for a new type of business, such as an app that utilizes the Uber model to utilize ride sharing for delivery services, it would not be patent eligible.


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Technically, it is not legal for someone to patent your invention: "The patent application includes a declaration in which the applicant swears that everything in the application is true. So if you falsely claim that you invented something when you did not, that would amount to fraud on the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which would result in a ...


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There are multiple ways to end up with two patents with claims that cover related subject matter. One is by filing two applications and the other is by having a continuation or divisional from a single parent or some more complicated filing relationship using more than one continuation or divisional. In the case of two applications they might or might not be ...


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Either option is ok, from a legal point of view. However, joint ownership can be quite difficult in practice. Generally any changes (such as assignments or licensing) require the assent of all the joint owners. If there is any kind of disagreement or falling out between the co-owners, the patent can become quite hard to administer. By having the patent ...


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The agreement is binding (to the extent of its wording and if they signed it to). To protect your work from being patented by somebody else you can either file a patent/utility model/design or publish it. As the law grants the patent to the first person to file, its basically your problem if someone else patents this first. UNLESS it was stolen from you, ...


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Read this answer: https://patents.stackexchange.com/a/17059/18033 to find out how long the patent is valid. If you have questions about the status of the patent, go here Is this patent valid? Granted? Which countries does it cover? Are there family members?. Those linked questions and answers provide you with a way to find out. To check if what you find ...


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