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5

Making and offering for sale are also on the list of things one can't do. Designing is ok but testing prototypes might be making and using. If the patent owner is agreeable you could negotiate a non-exclusive license for a single payment fixed amount to make and use but not to offer for sale or sell (until it expired). Or a license (exclusive or not ...


3

The PCT does not have any "grace period", it leaves that to each Contracting State and the national patent law thereof. If the International Searching Authority finds a disclosure made by the inventor prior to the international filing date, it will add a note either in the Search Report itself or in the Written Opinion. Once you enter national/...


2

There should be no problem. Let's set out a timeline: 1 Sep 2014: US provisional ("US1") is filed. 15 Oct 2014: Public disclosure of material in the US provisional filing. 31 Aug 2015: French Convention application ("FR1") claiming priority to US1 is filed. US1 is filed before the disclosure. The disclosure is therefore not relevant for ...


2

My impression of the PPA is that you can try to commercialize what's in it without inhibiting your chances of filing for a non-provisional one before your 12 months are up. I am not entirely sure, but what I know is form the USPTO website as quoted below: http://www.uspto.gov/patents-getting-started/patent-basics/types-patent-applications/provisional-...


1

In the U.S. something becomes prior art under 35 USC section 102 (1) the claimed invention was patented, described in a printed publication, or in public use, on sale, or otherwise available to the public before the effective filing date of the claimed invention; . . . Sending in the registration would not likely be considered a publication but if/...


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To create a prior-art-request, any user can follow the prior art request format and ask the AskPatents community for help finding prior art on a US Patent Application on AskPatents. Current Prior Art Requests on AskPatents How to Submit a Prior Art Request As revised by the America Invents Act (AIA), 35 U.S.C. § 122(e) expands the opportunity for third-...


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If you look it up in Public PAIR and click on the Image File Wrapper tab, you will see - 03-27-2018 N/AP Notice of Appeal Filed Rather than responding with a RCE/response/amendment to the final rejection, the application has filed for the first steps of an appeal. Along the way it has had other "final" rejections and also went abandoned briefly in ...


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In principle, everything you make available to the public can potentially cause trouble. The previous answer puts it well. The key question is: Is this product fully covered by your pending patent? If yes I see no reason to worry about intellectual property issues. If not then there are two solutions I can think of: 1) secrecy agreement as mentioned in the ...


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The invention, no -- improvements upon the invention, yes. In USA you get 12 months, in the rest of the world once you disclose your invention, you can't file for a patent. You have to see if someone can reduce to practice your idea(s) posted online. If not, it will only be considered prior art and it helps set precedence for the scope of what you can ...


1

Assuming you have access to the file on PAIR, any updates should essentially be in real time. In other words, once an office action response (or other document) is filed in a publicly available case, that filling immediately becomes public.


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For WIPO application Contact Details- Go to Patent Scope (WIPO Search interface) https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/search.jsf Input publication number details open respective patent application Go to Documents Tab and download Declaration; It will contain contact details e.g.


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As of now (10/2014) google patents never directly shows a final rejection or any other status change regarding an application. What they re-publish is the USPTO publication of the application. It is not a "living document" like a web page, it is a fixed thing like physical book. At the same time an application is published by the USPTO its entire history ...


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It always did until the AIA law went into effect. Now the law says: " PRIOR ART.—A person shall be entitled to a patent unless— (1) the claimed invention was patented, described in a printed publication, or in public use, on sale, or otherwise available to the public before the effective filing date of the claimed invention;" If the italicized phrase ...


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