7

That's a good question. In general you can use Public PAIR to find out a lot of detailed information about issued patents and pending patent applications. A good example is this is the touch screen patent by Steve Jobs: US7479949. The patent was subject to re-exam and all claims stand rejected in a non-final office action. The '949 patent provides an ...


4

Using PAIR, as Micah's detailed answer shows, is definitive and by far the best way to look things like this up. Not definitive but easy, if it has what you are looking for, is Google patents. It keeps getting better and as of a few months ago has a "Legal Events" section at the end of some patent documents. In the case of the infamous: Method of swinging ...


3

USPTO's PatFT provides functionality for this. In particular, the re-examination certificate (REEX, where REEX=YES refers to a certificate of re-examination being present) and current CPC classification class (CPCL) are probably be relevant. The query REEX/YES and CPCL/F25B seems to provide what you want.


3

I'm not a lawyer, and the facts of any particular case are determined by its specifics. Thus, you won't get a definitive answer here since you can't disclose your invention. That said, I have a few comments on your question. If your invention is something new, then it isn't mentioned in the previous patent. They can't just add new claims that aren't ...


3

Minime, That's a good question. The patent was subject to re-exam and all claims stand rejected in a non-final office action. George White or others on the AskPatents site may be able to provide more color on the the enforceability of a patent during re-exam proceedings as well as the prosecution history of this patent, which seems to be convoluted and ...


2

One big problem with such a question is that there is no such thing as "software patents". Software itself is not patentable, it is what the software does or is used to do -- the method -- that is patented. Software may be used to implement the whole invention (many data processing patents) or only one component of the invention (e.g. Diehr.) Many would not ...


2

A claim that survived reexamination is stronger afterwards than it was before. By definition, a claim that was originally dependent is narrower than the original independent claim. After reexamination the former dependent claim would be re-written in independent form. In general, the patent would cover a narrower territory, but be somewhat strengthened in ...


1

The grounds for an exparte reexamination are restricted to novelty and obvious challenges based on patents or published documents and on section 112 issues. Section 112 includes the requirement for proper support for claims in the specification, the claims not being indeterminate, and the specification being enabling. The allowed grounds do not include ...


1

Did you take a look at How does one know if a patent was reexamined? All your answers with graphical illustrations are there.


1

It's not that simple. The statistics only account for three situations. All clams lost. No claims lost. At least one claim amended. There are no statistics for at least one claim surviving,but in my experience it would be about 50%. Software claims don't get any special treatment.


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