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You can either use keywords for filtering, or something better, use the patent classifications systems put in place by different patent offices. Based on the technical details of the invention, the patent examiners classify each patent application according to a hierarchical classification system; each examiner may assign one or more classification codes to ...


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Google patents offers many ways to narrow a search. You might start with google patents advanced. It also has an "about" section. You can limit a search by country, status, just look in title, etc. Below is an excerpt from that information. Although google patents is usually used in a more simple way it does have Boolean capabilities and even now supports ...


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As mentioned in a comment, patent applications are not published until 18 months after initial filing. If it is a U.S. only filing it is possible that non-publication was requested and no publication will occur until and unless a patent issues. If the authors are not all in the U.S. there is a greater likelihood of one or more applications filed somewhere ...


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For the U.S. you can go to its patent search page and search for Legal Representative (LREP). I tried it with my first name last name, got 0 hits; first name middle initial last name, got 0 hits. Then I tried LREP/("George" AND "White") which would hit if anyone had my first name anywhere in their name AND also had my last name anywhere in their name. I got ...


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I can't vouch for its effectiveness since I've never used it, but The Lens has patent sequence search facility. This page is specifically for searching sequences. I do use The Lens for regular patent searching and think it works well and generally better than Google Patents.


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