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The compression and decompression algorythms of MP3 are patented by the owner, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, and thus are not freely available for commercial products or commercial use of the technology. personal use of the MP3-software is allowed. Open-source-encoders and decoders are being allowed. a patent-free alternative for MP3 is OGG Vorbis. other ...


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As some other answers have suggested, there are two major requirements that are relevant to your question. The two requiresments are: novelty and nonobviousness. (Nonobviousness is a U.S. term; in Europe this is referred to as inventive step.) To earn a patent, your invention must pass both tests. In your case, the invention passes the test of novelty ...


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What you are asking about is called provisional rights. Not be confused with the completely unrelated "provisional patent application". If a person infringes the invention claimed in a published patent application, and that application is later granted, the patent owner is entitled to a "reasonable royalty" from the infringer (35 USC § 154(d)(1)), if: the ...


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If it distinguishes in a non obvious manner over the known prior art (C3PO and other known robots) - yes. (You can file the patent no matter what, but that's the requirement for having the patent granted)' If you want to sell your product, the name and design are probably protected, so you would have to take care of that issue, but for patentability that ...


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Similar questions abound on this site. For the first question: For a random example, imagine that a technology/device patent claim for generating some image provides a method consisting of 5 steps. The first step is that the light used in generating said image must have a power of around 8100 to 8500 (just random, unitless numbers). Let's say I ...


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"About" is found in many claims, including range claims like the one you point out. There is a very rich case law and commentary about "about". The first issue would be the meaning of about in the context of the patent. If an alleged infringer was outside whatever that was determined to be then the doctrine of equivalents could come into ...


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Answering one aspect of the question - the step or element left out of a product to avoid infringe a claims does not need to be a novel step. Claims are novel and non-obvious as a whole and leaving out any positively claimed element avoids literal infringement. There is a claim format (Jepson or two-part) often used in the rest of the world but rarely ...


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This is very basic patent information that is duplicated in many previous answers. Each claim stands alone as something that defines a device, system or method that would constitute infringement. A product might infringe one or more claims of a patent. Infringing one claim is infringing the patent. To infringe a claim a product must contain all of the ...


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My experience is that it's very unlikely It sounds like you're asking whether it's possible to win a patent when the invention takes existing technology and applies it to a new product. If I understand correctly, you're suggesting that there's no technical hurdle or obstacle involved in the new application. That is, if you described your idea to a reasonably ...


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Like many things, the answer is maybe. To be patentable, an invention must be novel, non-obvious and useful. Novel means no one has already thought of it (and published the idea). Non-obvious means that someone skilled in the associated area of technology wouldn't find the idea to be obvious to do. In other words there needs to be some inventive step. Lastly,...


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The MPEG-LA group and Sisvel (Philips) prevent developers from adding MP3 support to their software packages without paying royalties. from http://en.swpat.org/wiki/Mp3 MP3 has at least three separate companies that claim to have patents, Alcatel-Lucent, Thompson and AudioMPEG. All their claimed US MP3 patents are listed in the automatically ...


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Determining whether or not an innovation is novel is usually based on a novelty search. This means performing a comprehensive search of the prior art, which includes not only existing products, but also patents, patent applications, and other published literature. Many patents and applications never result in an actual product, so there may be prior art ...


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If the all the characteristics of your invention are not found in one prior art single document then your invention is considered new. However, it might not be considered inventive if the combination of all these characteristics would be considered something straightforward to the skilled man in that technology area. As you might suspect this has to be seen ...


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