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You can do it anonymously if you file through a registered patent practitioner (patent attorney or patent agent). They are identified but you are not. This is from the USPTO FAQ on the AIA. Question PS3460: Can a third-party submission be filed anonymously? A real party in interest can remain anonymous by having someone else make the third-party ...


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The USPTO FAQ explains in detail (with examples) what can be included in concise description of relevance. The concise description of relevance must not propose rejections of the claims. Instead, the concise description should only set forth facts, explaining how an item listed is of potential relevance to the examination of the application in which ...


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As far as I can tell, the patent has only issued in the US. You can file a Post Grant Review within 9 months of the grant date of January 30, 2018. This article describes the options for challenging the patent.


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the reference to the "Patent" that you cited isn't actually a granted patent, it's only an application that has been published by the USPTO. If you are interested in submitting what you have done so that the patent examiners are aware of it, you can do it by following these directions: http://www.uspto.gov/patent/initiatives/third-party-preissuance-...


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1) Third party submission/observation allows for detailed remarks As DonQuiKong notes in an OP comment, a third party submission (US) or third party observation (outside US) allows accompanying statements on the relevance of specific portions of the prior art presented. However, it is important to note that "arguments" relating to patentability are not ...


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Both articles discuss WIPO, EPO and UKIPO practice. There is no limit regarding the number of TPO that may be filed during EPO proceedings. The TPO may refer to novelty (A54 EPC), inventive step (A56 EPC), insufficiency of disclosure (A83 EPC), added subject matter [A123(2)] or even clarity (A84 EPC) and unity (A82 EPC), the two latter notably NOT being a ...


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After publication, when you can see the claims, you might find that the references you previously submitted are not as on-target as you assumed and end up filing both. A consideration might be that a third party submission can be done anonymously.


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The answer is found in MPEP 2128 [R-08.2017]. In summary, yes your web-page counts as a printed publication if any "interested person" could have accessed your content without a confidentiality agreement. One common example of printed publication similar to your situation is a thesis published in a university library where no one has read the thesis but any ...


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Unless the Examiner is reading this site, posting prior art here is not going to do much. I would suggest considering either: a third party submission under MPEP 1134 (if applicable). See ==> http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/mpep/s1134.html; or a prior art submission to the USPTO under 37 CFR 1.501 and 35 USC 301. See ==> http://www.uspto.gov/web/...


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