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In the U.S. you need to include the "best mode" embodiment of your invention. You might be able to narrowly claim A such that a disclosure sufficient to enable A, alone, does not need to mention B as part of a best mode for A. If you had not yet developed B you could patent A and then develop a trade-secret B that made A more efficient. Since you already ...


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Based on feedback, i'm editing my answer. You are obligated to disclose your invention's best embodiment in the patent application. Thus if A isn't really sufficient without B I'm guessing you absolutely need to disclose both in your patent application. If however A is quite a reasonable invention by itself, and B is an independent invention (even if it ...


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Using the formula for Coke as an example, you could write down a detailed recipe that would be copyrighted as long as it was more than just a bare list. And you could keep the recipe secret. The added value of the copyright would not be very much. If someone reverse engineered the formula they would write it down in their own words that would not be not be ...


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It is possible to file a patent application AND retain the ability to treat it as a trade secret. When you file, you need to file a non-publication request. There are downsides in terms of foreign patent filings in doing so, but it also means that the patent application is never published, and remains secret, until the patent actually issues. Patents take ...


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Recipes can not be patented, and the form of Intellectual Property protection covered by this area is 'trade secrets'. Read about Trade Secrets through the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) website. Many foods are protected by Trade Secrets, for example, Coca-Cola. If a trade secret holder fails to maintain secrecy or if the information ...


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The two scenarios -- reverse engineering X or independently inventing X -- are significantly different. Assuming that X was not publicly available, B could very well independently invent X and be granted a patent on it (i.e., "first to file"). In the of X being made publicly available (as a product sold by A), X itself could not be patented by B. However,...


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There are many options but certainly you have to do following to avoid any liabilities:- Hire qualified attorney and get clear picture of patented claims, process, methods etc. they cover. it may seem to you that you have different product but you might be infringing other claims. Contact a legal counsel and reply to letter based on provided deadlines. if ...


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