5

In the context that the upcounsel article was written -- for the all-in cost of filing, prosecuting one application and then paying off maintenance fees to expiration for ONE patent in (presumably) ONE jurisdiction -- the stated fees are ABSOLUTELY NOT realistic. Even the low end of $220,000 would be insanely expensive. What happened was that the author of ...


3

The typical approach is to perform a "freedom-to-operate" analysis. You can take a crack at this yourself using patent searching tools like Google Patents or my preference The Lens. Patent searching is a skill so I would advise starting with a broad search and when you find patents that are relevant (not necessarily the same idea, but with some similarities) ...


3

What you are asking about is called provisional rights. Not be confused with the completely unrelated "provisional patent application". If a person infringes the invention claimed in a published patent application, and that application is later granted, the patent owner is entitled to a "reasonable royalty" from the infringer (35 USC § 154(d)(1)), if: the ...


2

Yes, if the structure and/or method of each is novel and non-obvious. Frequently a slow-release version is patented separately. Or they could be two distinct claims in a single granted patent.


2

At first it depends in which countries is your market, i.e. in which countries you are planning to start your business. You may start patent search in random patent databases to get some preliminary overview about possible relevant patent documents, but finally you need to analyze the legal and geographic protection coverage and statuses of critical patents ...


2

Designated countries only applies to PCT applications, not to US applications. Designated countries are those states in which a PCT application may subsequently enter national or regional phase. That is, if a state is not designated, no national or regional phase entry application can be filed later from that PCT application. There are four regional patent ...


1

You've discovered the dirty laundry of the patent system. There is no burden to prove your invention actually works. Some people might argue this isn't a problem since no one would want to infringe on a technology that doesn't function. However where this breaks down is when the patent gets an overly broad claim. So to answer your question, I'm not sure if ...


1

There are many many patents with the term "value-at-risk" in the tile or body. From google patents - The oldest one System and method for determination of incremental value at risk for securities … EP US JP AU CA US5819237A Mark B. Garman Financial Engineering Associates, Inc. filed 1996-02-13 The most recent US10277525B2 Method and apparatus ...


1

Yes, most are publicaly available from the USPTO and google patents. I believe google has a way of bulk access. Unless non-publication is selected by the applicant, they are published at 18 months after the earliest claimed priority document. Most other countries do not allow non-publication. The 18 month publication date is uniform internationally.


1

Assignments may be differently worded; but you very likely assigned full title and ownership. If the assignee wants to waste the patent opportunity it’s their right. Actually, the assignee may have decided that going the trade secret approach would provide a better return than a patent. The facts of this situation may support this theory. But you did ...


1

You can send information about "2013-11-04: They filed a Pakistani application" to PCT International Bureau via https://pct.wipo.int/LoginForms/epct.jsp PCT international bureau may consider the reference and may issue negative evaluation in international search report, but it is not binding to countries specified at PCT application. In order to "reject" ...


1

Unfortunately this isn't my field so I'll only give general guidance. US6867776 is indeed a granted patent which should expire on Jan 10, 2021. In order to infringe on a patent you must infringe on each and every step of at least one claim. Thus even if one of the steps of a claim is a problem, so long as there is another step that you don't implement, you ...


1

This is the kind of thing that commercial IP databases do well. The assignment information is available from the various national patent offices. The commercial concerns cross reference all of the assignments with data from state/national corporate registration databases to ensure that these are all found. The process is, I expect, rather intensive and so ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible