16

Microsoft Excel 2000 did this. Source: The Excel short menus show the most popular commands. You can always get to the rest of the commands by clicking the chevron at the bottom of a menu to display the full menu. As you continue to use Excel, frequently used commands move to the short menus and unused commands move to the full menus. "Displaying a ...


12

Also look at this research article: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF00126652 ("Design and evaluation of an adaptive icon toolbar" published in 1996). In the abstract we see: This paper describes the decision-making algorithm implemented in the bar. It also describes the bar's self-adaptive behavior of displaying the frequency of each icon's ...


7

Tag cloud was my first thought too, although the typical tag cloud isn't based on the number of times click on an item in the cloud, rather the number of times the keyword appears somewhere (in the article, website, etc.) Although, I did find this implementation of a tag cloud (http://www.solspace.com/docs/tag/cloud/) that does provide that functionality: ...


6

Although design patents might be a good way to go, you may be able to gain some measure of protection for your gui with copyright. The pdf found here provides more information than I can provide in this answer.


5

Nintendo (or any other software manufacturer) can benefit from several forms of intellectual property protection to prevent copies and imitations, including utility patents but also design patents, trademarks and copyright. Besides intellectual property protection, other protections exist including laws against unfair competition or parasitic copying. ...


5

A non final rejection was issued in November. Besides a rejection due to non patentable subject matter, 19 of the 20 claims were seen as anticipated by us2008/0165022, Hertz. The remaining claim was seen as obvious under Hertz in light of examiner's knowledge. You can look it up in public PAIR. Also Hertz has been issued as US7671756 in 2010. I did not ...


4

Wikipedia contains a page on Tag Cloud: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tag_cloud&oldid=14843923 from June 7, 2005. From the Patent Application: Modifying the APPEARANCE OF AN ICON based on its FREQUENCY OF USE From the Wikipedia article: the more commonly used tags are displayed with a larger font or stronger emphasis this implies ...


4

Um, isn't click+drag to zoom a ubiquitous example of these claims? All three of those claims are trivial, and combining them doesn't create something non-trivial. Every element in a GUI is already "encompassed by a frame"...the enclosing window. The click+drag is the user request for the other requirement of (1). Data structures containing the objects (...


4

KDE 3.0 included UI tab elements that could be placed wherever you liked for whatever purpose (including tabbed toolbars). You could also select whether or not you wanted to display text, icons, or text+icons. 99% of the time applications put these tabs on the left or right of the page but I don't think that matters from the standpoint of the patent ...


3

Lotus eSuite (1991, source) had an early implementation of a tabbed toolbar highly similar to Microsoft's current Ribbon UI:


3

I have been writing systems that do this since around 1999. Various papers describing these, e.g.: Dron, J., Boyne, C., & Mitchell, R. (2001). Footpaths in the Stuff Swamp. Paper presented at the WebNet 2001, Orlando, Florida. Describes how topic tags grow and shrink according to number of clicks. But these were words, not icons. Dron, J. (2005). ...


3

As @EricS mentioned, the word algorithm will trigger the word "abstract" which is hard to get around once it is invoked. It doesn't really matter if it is one or two provisional applications since one or more non-provisionals can get the benefit of one or more provisionals. No one-to-one correspondence needed. The only reason I can think of would ...


2

A list of recently used applications is probably enough to invalidate this patent application. It essentially displays the frequency of use of an application. If it's unfrequently used, it will fall out of the list. If it's frequently used it will be included. Exclusion/inclusion in the list is the same as changing appearence as visible/invisible is a change ...


2

isn't that basically a tag cloud? as the tags get more popular they become bigger.


2

Wouldn't this be considered a TreeMap? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_map with Frequency of use as its value?


2

Not just Excel, Word as well, probably the whole office suite. Just replace 'icon' with 'menu item', and it describes the behaviour of the menus in Office since version 2000. Now how is an icon different from a menu item? Both are areas on the screen that can be selected to activate a function. With Office 2007 the menus were rearranged and transformed into ...


2

Crazyegg does exactly this. It (1) stores frequency of use of icons on a webpage and (2) changes their appearance to reflect it, with a frequency of use heatmap. Heatma.ps also does this but for Android apps instead of webpages.


2

WO2012113874A1 Seems to covers storing the method of forming the transform specifically in the case of a touch screen. I general I feel most of the methods of this patent are covered for this specific case


2

Yes - a very simplified way of thinking about it is that patent laws are set up to cover "what it is and how it works". Accidental, unknowing, independent invention is not a defense for patent infringement and re-implementing something you know is patented is worse. Designing around a patent is fine, and in some ways is encouraged. The difference is you ...


2

"Allaire's HomeSite software. This was for webdesigning, was later sold asMacromedia Homesite)" importantly, in the tabbed toolbar, see "Quick Tab","Fonts"."Tables" tabs. It is prior art of ribbon UI also enlarge this picture


2

Others have mentioned design patents and copyright. Those are worth considering. Remember that your published work is automatically protected by copyright, but registering the copyright simplifies any litigation and in some circumstances may increase your damages. If you’re considering a patent, remember that the cost of actually obtaining the patent is a ...


2

As previously mentioned, this is a challenging area for patentability and it is more important that you draft the application in sufficient detail to describe the practical application of the algorithm and the inventive concept of your invention so you can argue against a potential rejection under Section 101. It may not be in your best interest to file a ...


2

Regarding the decision of filing one or two provisional applications, George White's answer is very on point. You should be aware though that presentations of information are not patentable in many countries, for example most if not all European countries. At the EPO, this is enshrined in Art. 52(d) of the European Patent Convention. When presentations of ...


1

Would the Wayback Machine help? Screenshot and link below are for an MP3 page but you could probably easily find something for laptops by clicking around. Screenshot from 2010: http://cl.ly/image/0S2i243K251z Page: http://web.archive.org/web/20100217121624/http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&SubCategory=23&N=2100080023


1

Didn't just about all of Dell's online shopping screens allow this? Hard to tell now as Dell update this stuff all the time. (Purely coincidence my answer actually matches their example).


1

The priority date of the application is January 19th 2011. This is about four months before the article's publication date. Therefore the publication itself is not prior art to the patent application. Also, it is not clear that the claims of the patent application are things that are "taught" by the article. Some claims cover one of two sources being human ...


1

A small search on Google Prior Art finder led me to this: ftp://db.stanford.edu/public_html/cstr/reports/csl/tr/88/369/CSL-TR-88-369.pdf It talks about Inter-Views, (multiple views) and switching between them.


1

The TED site uses the same idea long before Dec 9, 2011. http://www.ted.com/ You have various filters to resize the images by - most viewed, most commented, most popular this month...


1

Apple's dock icons could be said to be already using this technology, which would constitute prior art. Depending on activity, dock icons can be "badged" with a number. This badging changes the appearance. The number might indicate pending activities (such as incoming email), or other things. The important part is "other things", because what the number ...


1

Published at least as early as March 1, 1996: "This paper...describes the bar's self-adaptive behavior of displaying the frequency of each icon's use through the icon's size." Debevc, M., Meyer, B., Donlagic, D., & Svecko, R. (1996). Design and evaluation of an adaptive icon toolbar. User Modeling and User-Adapted Interaction, 6, 1-21 http://link....


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