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That's not accurate. For many countries, the number of the patent is followed actually by a "B". However, it's not a rule. You probably come across the "A" publications, because (again for most countries) "A" is used for the patent applications of US, Europe and PCT-applications and those offices are they main tools for databases. And as applications always ...


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"WO" is the two letter country code for PCT applications. As for patents in other territories, an application is first given an application number and then a separate publication number. In fact, these two numbers you mention relate to the same application (application number PCT/CA2004/001083 was published as WO 2005/006842). An International Patent ...


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Still valid, 20th year renewal paid on 26 July 2017. Please see https://www.ipo.gov.uk/p-ipsum/Case/PublicationNumber/GB2340070.


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That patent was issued in 1979 and expired 17 years later. The rules changed in 1995 and now patents expire 20 years from their priority date which is usually the filing date.


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You are right up until the point you mention the "A" suffix. Most of us, I suppose, gather information for major markets, so you can make a list where you will gather kind codes for applications and granted patents. EPO, USA, Australia, Japan use a "B" for granted patents. Canada uses a "C". China used to have a "C" for granted patents, now it's a "B". All ...


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The patent in question was granted in the US only: https://patents.google.com/patent/US8267291B2/en The same patent was not filed in the European Patent Office (EPO) or any other office or country, and too much time has elapsed to do so. Therefore, the only risk of infringement is within the US market.


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The term of the patent for an application filed after 1995 is 20 years after the priority date, subject to terminal disclaimers and/or extensions under 37.CFR 154. In this case the priority date is May 30, 1997 based on an earlier filed Italian patent, there is no terminal disclaimer (from the first page of the patent, none listed), and there is no ...


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A patent is a legal document which confers protection within time and space, so if it is a US patent, it is merely a legal document which confers protection only in USA. Nonetheless according to the PCT and other conventions, you may have patents on the same family, i.e., which share the same priority date, which are valid in other countries, namely India. ...


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The previous answer is only partially correct. India indeed became part of the PCT in December 1998, but before that date you could simply follow the national route. So if you search the Indian Patent Office you will find the respective member of this family, patent IN194756, currently in force (valid). The next (and last) renewal fees are due this coming ...


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